Quantcast
Get breaking news alerts via email

Click here to manage your alerts
President Barack Obama pauses as he speaks at the election night party at McCormick Place, Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2012, in Chicago. Obama defeated Republican challenger former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
Given 2nd term, Obama now facing new urgent task
First Published Nov 07 2012 12:38 pm • Last Updated Nov 07 2012 02:20 pm

WASHINGTON • One day after his surprisingly comfortable re-election, a triumphant President Barack Obama headed back to the White House and divided government on Wednesday with little time left for a compromise with Republicans to avert spending cuts and tax increases that threaten a new recession.

The president also is looking ahead to top-level personnel changes in a second term, involving three powerful Cabinet portfolios at a minimum.

Photos
Join the Discussion
Post a Comment

Republicans headed into a season of potentially painful reflection after retaining control of the House but losing the presidency and falling deeper into the Senate minority. One major topic: the changing face of America.

"We’ve got to deal with the issue of immigration through good policy. What is the right policy if we want economic growth in America as it relates to immigration?" said former Republican Party Chairman Haley Barbour. Obama drew support from about 70 percent of all Hispanics, far outpacing Republican challenger Mitt Romney.

There was little time to celebrate for the winners, with a postelection session of Congress scheduled to convene next Tuesday. By common agreement, the main order of business is the search for a compromise to keep the economy from falling off a so-called "fiscal cliff."

The White House said Obama had made postelection phone calls to congressional leaders and reiterated a commitment to bipartisan steps to "reduce our deficit in a balanced way, cut taxes for middle class families and small businesses and create jobs."

"The president said he believed that the American people sent a message in yesterday’s election that leaders in both parties need to put aside their partisan interests and work with common purpose to put the interests of the American people and the American economy first," the statement said.

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., told reporters that any solution should include higher taxes on "the richest of the rich." That was in keeping with Obama’s election platform, which calls for the expiration of tax cuts on income over $200,000 for individuals and $250,000 for couples.

Reid said he spoke with Republican House Speaker John Boehner as well as Obama Tuesday night as the election results became known, and he declared that "of course" a compromise was possible on the overall issue.

"I’m not going to draw a line in the sand. He’s not going to draw a line in the sand, I don’t believe," Reid said of Boehner.


story continues below
story continues below

The speaker set a conference call with his Republican rank and file for mid-afternoon.

He said in pre-election interviews he would not agree to raise taxes on small business owners, a formulation Republicans often use in opposing the president’s position on the issue.

Barring legislation by year’s end, taxes are on course to rise by more than $500 billion in 2013, and spending is to be cut by an additional $130 billion or so, totals that would increase over a decade. The blend is designed to rein in the federal debt, but officials in both parties warn it poses a grave threat to an economic recovery that has been halting at best.

Obama and congressional leaders in both parties say they want an alternative, but serious compromise talks were non-existent during the fierce campaign season.

That ended Tuesday in an election in which more than 119 million votes were cast, mostly without controversy despite dire predictions of politically charged recounts and lawsuits while the presidency hung in the balance.

Obama won the popular vote narrowly, the electoral vote comfortably, and the battleground states where the campaign was principally waged in a landslide.

The president carried seven of the nine states where he, Romney and their allies spent nearly $1 billion on television commercials, winning Ohio, Wisconsin, Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada, Colorado and Virginia.

The Republican challenger won North Carolina, and Florida remained too close to call

Obama also turned back late moves by Republicans in Pennsylvania, Michigan and Minnesota.

Hispanics account for a larger share of the population than the national average in Nevada and Colorado, two of the closely contested battleground states. The president’s outsized majority among Hispanics — in the range of 70 percent according to Election Day interviews with voters — helped him against a challenger who called earlier in the year for self-deportation of illegal immigrants.

Other factors in crucial states:

Next Page >


Copyright 2014 The Salt Lake Tribune. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Top Reader Comments Read All Comments Post a Comment
Click here to read all comments   Click here to post a comment


About Reader Comments


Reader comments on sltrib.com are the opinions of the writer, not The Salt Lake Tribune. We will delete comments containing obscenities, personal attacks and inappropriate or offensive remarks. Flagrant or repeat violators will be banned. If you see an objectionable comment, please alert us by clicking the arrow on the upper right side of the comment and selecting "Flag comment as inappropriate". If you've recently registered with Disqus or aren't seeing your comments immediately, you may need to verify your email address. To do so, visit disqus.com/account.
See more about comments here.
Staying Connected
Videos
Jobs
Contests and Promotions
  • Search Obituaries
  • Place an Obituary

  • Search Cars
  • Search Homes
  • Search Jobs
  • Search Marketplace
  • Search Legal Notices

  • Other Services
  • Advertise With Us
  • Subscribe to the Newspaper
  • Login to the Electronic Edition
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Contact a newsroom staff member
  • Access the Trib Archives
  • Privacy Policy
  • Missing your paper? Need to place your paper on vacation hold? For this and any other subscription related needs, click here or call 801.204.6100.