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Lights in lower Manhattan, misery in outer regions


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Many runners understood the decision, especially with the death toll from the storm at 106, including 40 in New York City. The destruction and power outages made many New Yorkers recoil at the idea of police protecting a foot race and evicting storm victims from hotels to make way for runners. More than half of the 40,000 runners were from out of town.

Some runners, though, vowed to never enter New York again. Pia Nielsen, who flew in from Copenhagen, said city and race officials would have to regain her trust.

At a glance

What’s happening, state by state

The massive storm that started out as Hurricane Sandy slammed into the East Coast and morphed into a huge and problematic system, killing at least 105 people in the United States. Power outages now stand at more than 2.6 million homes and businesses, down from a peak of 8.5 million. Here’s a snapshot of what is happening, state by state.

Connecticut

Gas shortages in the New York area sends motorists across state lines to Connecticut in search of fuel. Lines form at gas stations near Interstate 95. Deaths: 3. Power outages: 227,500, down from a peak of 625,000.

Massachusetts

As Massachusetts returns to normal, it sends volunteers and National Guard members to help in storm-battered New York. Massachusetts’ federally-owned T.S. Kennedy heading to Elizabeth, N.J., on Sunday. The 540-foot ship will serve as a “hotel” for emergency workers, power crews and others helping the region get back on its feet. Deaths: None. Power outages: about 1,000, down from 400,000.

New Jersey

Fueling up vehicles was the primary goal for many, especially those trying to make purchases before a gas rationing system took effect at noon Saturday in 12 northern New Jersey counties. Drivers waited in line for more than 30 minutes at one Jersey City station. City police officers were waving motorists in and out to expedite the process. Deaths: 22. Power outages: 1.2 million, down from 2.7 million.

New York

New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg was determined to keep the city’s huge marathon as scheduled, but finally canceled it, he says, because the controversy was becoming a distraction. Bloomberg says he still thinks the city had the resources to manage the race and tend to the massive cleanup after Superstorm Sandy. “I’m sorry. I fought the battle. And sometimes things don’t work out,” he said. Deaths: 48, including 41 in New York City. Power outages: 900,000, down from 2.2 million.

Pennsylvania

Between 250 and 300 polling places remained without power just days before Tuesday’s election. The Red Cross closed all but two of its emergency shelters in the state. Deaths: 15. Power outages: 163,000, down from 1.2 million.

Rhode Island

Gov. Lincoln Chafee signs a request seeking a presidential disaster declaration in three of the state’s five counties. Organizers recruit volunteers to spend the day Saturday in Westerly’s beach community, where they will clear away debris and remove sand that inundated homes, shops and other businesses. Deaths: None. Power outages: 7,800, down from more than 122,000.

Other states with storm-related deaths: Maryland (4), New Hampshire (1), North Carolina (2), Ohio (2), Virginia (2), West Virginia (6).

Sources: Local and state authorities; AP reporting

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But Lucy Marquez said she would come back, even as tears filled her eyes at the thought of the three young children she left at home in Mexico to run in her first marathon — a race her father competed in 12 years ago.

"Shock. Denial. Rage," she said. "I love New York City. This is the marathon I want to run."

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Associated Press writers Ben Nuckols in Wall, N.J.; Katie Zezima in Jersey City, N.J., and Verena Dobnik, AJ Connelly and Larry Neumeister in New York contributed to this report.




Copyright 2014 The Salt Lake Tribune. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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