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Lights in lower Manhattan, misery in outer regions
First Published Nov 03 2012 11:04 am • Last Updated Nov 03 2012 05:04 pm

New York • The lights were back on Saturday in lower Manhattan, prompting screams of sweet relief from residents who’d been plunged into darkness for nearly five days by Superstorm Sandy. But that joy contrasted with deepening resentment in the city’s outer boroughs and suburbs over a continued lack of power and maddening gas shortages.

Adding to the misery of those lacking power, heat or gasoline: dipping temperatures. Mayor Michael Bloomberg urged older residents without heat to move to shelters, and said 25,000 blankets were being distributed across the city.

At a glance

What’s happening, state by state

The massive storm that started out as Hurricane Sandy slammed into the East Coast and morphed into a huge and problematic system, killing at least 105 people in the United States. Power outages now stand at more than 2.6 million homes and businesses, down from a peak of 8.5 million. Here’s a snapshot of what is happening, state by state.

Connecticut

Gas shortages in the New York area sends motorists across state lines to Connecticut in search of fuel. Lines form at gas stations near Interstate 95. Deaths: 3. Power outages: 227,500, down from a peak of 625,000.

Massachusetts

As Massachusetts returns to normal, it sends volunteers and National Guard members to help in storm-battered New York. Massachusetts’ federally-owned T.S. Kennedy heading to Elizabeth, N.J., on Sunday. The 540-foot ship will serve as a “hotel” for emergency workers, power crews and others helping the region get back on its feet. Deaths: None. Power outages: about 1,000, down from 400,000.

New Jersey

Fueling up vehicles was the primary goal for many, especially those trying to make purchases before a gas rationing system took effect at noon Saturday in 12 northern New Jersey counties. Drivers waited in line for more than 30 minutes at one Jersey City station. City police officers were waving motorists in and out to expedite the process. Deaths: 22. Power outages: 1.2 million, down from 2.7 million.

New York

New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg was determined to keep the city’s huge marathon as scheduled, but finally canceled it, he says, because the controversy was becoming a distraction. Bloomberg says he still thinks the city had the resources to manage the race and tend to the massive cleanup after Superstorm Sandy. “I’m sorry. I fought the battle. And sometimes things don’t work out,” he said. Deaths: 48, including 41 in New York City. Power outages: 900,000, down from 2.2 million.

Pennsylvania

Between 250 and 300 polling places remained without power just days before Tuesday’s election. The Red Cross closed all but two of its emergency shelters in the state. Deaths: 15. Power outages: 163,000, down from 1.2 million.

Rhode Island

Gov. Lincoln Chafee signs a request seeking a presidential disaster declaration in three of the state’s five counties. Organizers recruit volunteers to spend the day Saturday in Westerly’s beach community, where they will clear away debris and remove sand that inundated homes, shops and other businesses. Deaths: None. Power outages: 7,800, down from more than 122,000.

Other states with storm-related deaths: Maryland (4), New Hampshire (1), North Carolina (2), Ohio (2), Virginia (2), West Virginia (6).

Sources: Local and state authorities; AP reporting

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"We’re New Yorkers and we’re going to get through it," the mayor said. "But I don’t want anyone to think we’re out of the woods."

Bloomberg also said that resolving gas shortages could take days. Lines snaked around gas stations for many blocks all over the stricken region, including northern New Jersey, where Gov. Chris Christie imposed rationing that recalled the worst days of fuel shortages of the 1970s.

But nowhere was the scene more confused than at a refueling station in Brooklyn, where the National Guard gave out free gas — an effort to alleviate the situation. There, a mass of honking cars, desperate drivers and people on foot, carrying containers from empty bleach bottles to five-gallon Poland Spring water jugs, was just the latest testament to the misery unleashed by Sandy.

"It’s chaos, it’s pandemonium out here," said Chris Damon, who had been waiting for 3½ hours at the site and had circled the block five times. "It seems like nobody has any answers."

Added Damon: "I feel like a victim of Hurricane Katrina. I never thought it could happen here in New York, but it’s happened."

Damon, 42, had already been displaced to Brooklyn from his home in Queens, where he still lacked power, as did millions outside Manhattan — from Staten Island, the hardest-hit borough, to Westchester County and other suburban areas.

Domingo Isasi, waiting in a gas line on Staten Island, minced no words about the divide he perceived between Manhattan and the outer boroughs.

"The priorities are showing, simply by the fact that Manhattan got their power back," he said, adding that Staten Islanders are used to being lower on the list. "We’re the bastard kids who keep getting slapped in the head and told to shut up," he said.


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At a gas giveaway station in Queens, the scene was calmer but not happier. More than 400 cars stretched for more than a dozen blocks, with one tanker filling cars one at a time. A police car pulled alongside a car about 250th in line, and officers told the driver they hoped there would still be gas by the time he got there.

The 5,000-gallon trucks from the Defense Department had been dispatched to five locations around the New York City metropolitan area. "Do not panic. I know there is anxiety about fuel," Gov. Andrew Cuomo said.

Hours later, after the long lines formed, state officials said the public should stay away from the refueling stations until emergency responders got their gas. National Guard Col. Richard Goldenberg added, however, that those who were already at the distribution sites would not be turned away.

Gas rationing went into effect at noon in 12 counties of northern New Jersey, where police enforced rules to allow only motorists with odd-numbered license plates to refuel. Those with even-numbered plates would get their turn Sunday.

Jessica Tisdale of Totowa waited in her Mercedes SUV for 40 minutes at a gas station in Jersey City, but didn’t quite understand the system and was ordered to pull away because of her even-numbered plate.

"Is it the number or the letter?" she asked around 12:10 p.m. "I don’t think it’s fair. I’ve been in the line since before noon. ...There’s no clarity." The officer who waved her out of line threw up his hands and shrugged.

At an Exxon station in Wall, N.J., Kathryn Davidson, who had an even-numbered plate, got gas anyway by beating the noon deadline.

"How are people supposed to know?" said Davidson, 53, who said it reminded her of the 1970s, when a similar plan was in place.

President Barack Obama visited the headquarters of the Federal Emergency Management Agency for an update on recovery efforts and said: "There’s nothing more important than us getting this right."

He cited the need to restore power; pump out water, particularly from electric substations; ensure that basic needs are addressed; remove debris; and get federal resources in place to help transportation systems come back on line.

About 2.6 million people remained without power in six states after Sandy came ashore Monday night.

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