Quantcast
Get breaking news alerts via email

Click here to manage your alerts
Last shuttle’s retirement move pains workers



< Previous Page


"We’ve all known it’s coming, but still until you actually get there, you really don’t understand how you’re going to feel," said Stilson, who will be moving on to a job at NASA headquarters in Washington.

For her, the tears didn’t flow until the last leg of Endeavour’s cross-country flight to Los Angeles in September. Then, "I was bawling like a baby."

Photos
Join the Discussion
Post a Comment

Bakehorn, in fact, is skipping Friday’s big Atlantis event, which is drawing NASA brass as well as members of the public paying up to $90 apiece.

"I’ve said my goodbyes. You can only do it only so many times," he said Thursday.

Earlier this week, the two NASA astronauts aboard the space station, Sunita Williams and Kevin Ford, thanked the remaining shuttle workers for their contribution. They also offered reassurance.

"We wouldn’t be here on the International Space Station if it wasn’t for the successful work of the space shuttles bringing all these modules up here," Williams told The Associated Press. "I’m sure there are many places that their talents would be wanted and desired."

To make it clear that Kennedy isn’t shutting down, NASA held a pair of news conferences on the eve of Atlantis’ move to talk up the growing commercial side of the space program and the future of human exploration.

Just this past Sunday, an unmanned SpaceX Dragon capsule returned science samples and equipment from the space station after dropping off cargo. The Dragon rocketed into orbit Oct. 7 from the adjoining Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.

The California-based company hopes to provide ferry rides for astronauts in a few years and create more SpaceX jobs at Cape Canaveral.

But that’s in the future. Those about to lose their jobs are more focused on the here and now. They realize that they likely will have to settle for less satisfying work and lower pay.


story continues below
story continues below

Walsh doesn’t hold out much hope.

"I’m old. Too old. I’m 65," he said with a sigh. "I’m not ready to retire, but it looks like I’ll have to."



Copyright 2014 The Salt Lake Tribune. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Top Reader Comments Read All Comments Post a Comment
Click here to read all comments   Click here to post a comment


About Reader Comments


Reader comments on sltrib.com are the opinions of the writer, not The Salt Lake Tribune. We will delete comments containing obscenities, personal attacks and inappropriate or offensive remarks. Flagrant or repeat violators will be banned. If you see an objectionable comment, please alert us by clicking the arrow on the upper right side of the comment and selecting "Flag comment as inappropriate". If you've recently registered with Disqus or aren't seeing your comments immediately, you may need to verify your email address. To do so, visit disqus.com/account.
See more about comments here.
Staying Connected
Videos
Jobs
Contests and Promotions
  • Search Obituaries
  • Place an Obituary

  • Search Cars
  • Search Homes
  • Search Jobs
  • Search Marketplace
  • Search Legal Notices

  • Other Services
  • Advertise With Us
  • Subscribe to the Newspaper
  • Login to the Electronic Edition
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Contact a newsroom staff member
  • Access the Trib Archives
  • Privacy Policy
  • Missing your paper? Need to place your paper on vacation hold? For this and any other subscription related needs, click here or call 801.204.6100.