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Hezbollah leads massive anti-U.S. protest in Lebanon


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Police charged the crowd in the town of Wari, beating protesters back with batons, Ahmad said. The demonstrators then attacked the office of a senior government official and surrounded a local police station, said Ahmad, who locked himself inside with several other officers.

One protester died when police and demonstrators exchanged fire, and several others were wounded, police official Akhtar Hayat said.

At a glance

California filmmaker’s family leaves home overnight

The family of a filmmaker linked to an anti-Islamic movie has left their California home in the middle of the night.

A spokesman with the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department says Nakoula Basseley Nakoula’s relatives left their Cerritos home about 3:45 a.m. Monday. Deputies gave them a ride and they were reunited with Nakoula, then taken to an undisclosed location.

Nakoula wore heavy apparel to disguise his appearance when he left his home over the weekend. He was interviewed by federal probation officers, who are reviewing a 2010 case in which he was convicted of bank fraud.

Federal authorities have identified Nakoula as the key figure behind “Innocence of Muslims,” a film denigrating Islam that ignited violence against U.S. embassies in the Middle East.

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Several hundred people chanted slogans and burned an American flag outside the U.S. Consulate in the eastern city of Lahore. Some who tried to reach the wall of the consulate scuffled with baton-wielding police.

Hundreds battled police for a second day in the southern city of Karachi as they tried to reach the U.S. Consulate. Police lobbed tear gas and fired in the air to disperse the protesters, who were from the student wing of the Jamaat-e-Islami party. Police arrested 40 students, but no injuries were reported, said senior police officer Asif Ejaz Shaikh.

Pakistanis have also held many peaceful protests against the film, including one in the southwest town of Chaman on Monday attended by around 3,000 students and teachers.

The chief justice of Pakistan’s Supreme Court ordered the government’s telecommunications authority to block access to the film. Government officials have said they are trying to block the video, as well as other content considered blasphemous, but it was still viewable Monday on YouTube.

Hundreds of Indonesians clashed with police outside the U.S. Embassy in Jakarta, hurling rocks and firebombs and setting tires on fire.

At least 10 police were taken to the hospital after being hit with rocks and attacked with bamboo sticks, said Police Chief Maj. Gen. Untung Rajad. He said four protesters were arrested and one was hospitalized.

Demonstrators burned a picture of Obama and also tried to ignite a fire truck parked outside the embassy after ripping a water hose off the vehicle and torching it. Police used a bullhorn to appeal for calm and deployed water cannons and tear gas to try to disperse the crowd.

"We will destroy America like this flag!" a protester screamed while burning a U.S. flag. "We will chase away the American ambassador from the country!"


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Demonstrations were also held Monday in the Indonesian cities of Medan and Bandung.

German authorities are considering whether to ban the public screening of the film because it could endanger public security, Chancellor Angela Merkel said. A fringe far-right political party says it plans to show the film in Berlin in November.

Iran’s top leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, called on Western countries to block the film to prove they are not "accomplices" in a "big crime," according to Iranian state TV.

U.S. officials say they cannot limit free speech and Google Inc. refuses to do a blanket ban on the YouTube video clip. This leaves individual countries putting up their own blocks.

Associated Press writers Heidi Vogt in Kabul, Abdullah Khan in Timergarah, Pakistan, Adil Jawad in Karachi, Pakistan, Niniek Karmini in Jakarta, Indonesia, and Matthew Lee in Washington contributed to this report.

Libyan witness: Stevens was breathing when found

Ambassador Chris Stevens was still breathing when Libyans stumbled across him inside a room in the American Consulate in Benghazi, pulled him out and drove him to a hospital after last week’s deadly attack in the eastern Libyan city, witnesses told The Associated Press on Monday.

Fahd al-Bakoush, a freelance videographer, was among the Libyan civilians searching through the consulate after gunmen and protesters rampaged through it last Tuesday night. Al-Bakoush said he heard someone call out that he had tripped over a dead body.

A group of people gathered as several men pulled the seemingly lifeless form from the room. They saw he was alive and a foreigner, though no one recognized him as Stevens, al-Bakoush said.

He was breathing and his eyelids flickered, he said. “I tested his pulse and he was alive,” he said “No doubt. His face was blackened and he was like a paralyzed person.”

Video taken by al-Bakoush and posted on YouTube shows Stevens being carried out of a small dark room through a window with a raised shutter and being laid on the floor. One man touches his neck to feel for a pulse. Some of the men shout, “God is great.”

The video has been authenticated since Stevens’ face is clearly visible and he is wearing the same white t-shirt seen in authenticated photos of him being carried away one another man’s shoulders, presumably moments later. Two colleagues of al-Bakoush who also witnessed the scene confirmed that he took the footage.

Stevens and three other Americans were killed in the attack on the consulate, part of a wave of assaults on U.S. diplomatic missions in Muslim countries over a low-budget movie made in the United States that denigrates the Prophet Muhammad.

The accounts of all three witnesses mesh with that of the doctor who treated Stevens that night. Last week, the doctor told The Associated Press that Stevens was nearly lifeless when he was brought by Libyans, with no other Americans around, to the Benghazi hospital where he worked. He said Stevens had severe asphyxia from the smoke and that he tried to resuscitate him with no success. Only later did security officials confirm it was Stevens.

A freelance photographer who was with al-Bakoush at the scene, Abdel-Qader Fadl, said Stevens was unconscious and “maybe moved his head, but only once.”

Ahmed Shams, a 22-year-old arts student who works with the two, said the group cried out “God is great” in celebration after discovering he wasn’t dead. “We were happy to see him alive. The youth tried to rescue him. But there was no security, no ambulances, nothing to help,” he said.

The men carried Stevens to a private car to drive him to the hospital since there was no ambulance, all three witnesses said.

— The Associated Press



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