Quantcast
Get breaking news alerts via email

Click here to manage your alerts
FILE - In this Saturday, Nov. 19, 2011 file photo, Robert Champion, a drum major in Florida A&M University's Marching 100 band, performs during halftime of a football game in Orlando, Fla. The parents of Robert Champion held a news conference in Atlanta, Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012, to voice their disappointment at FAMU's response to their lawsuit. They claim that FAMU is not taking responsibility for the safety of their students. (AP Photo/The Tampa Tribune, Joseph Brown III, File) SST. PETERSBURG OUT; LAKELAND OUT; BRADENTON OUT; MAGS OUT; LOCAL TV OUT; WTSP CH 10 OUT; WFTS CH 28 OUT; WTVT CH 13 OUT; BAYNEWS 9 OUT
FAMU holds first home game without famed band
First Published Sep 15 2012 12:47 pm • Last Updated Sep 15 2012 12:48 pm

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. • As Florida A&M’s Marching 100 quick-stepped across the grass, the stadium announcer’s voice would boom through the speakers to remind those in the stands that no one could match the show they were watching: "Often imitated, never duplicated."

This season, the words more commonly used to describe FAMU’s famed marching band, which has performed at high-profile events like the Super Bowl, are "disgraced" and "suspended." Saturday marks the first football game in decades that will not feature a halftime show of elaborate dances, booming percussion and thundering brass.

Join the Discussion
Post a Comment

The band will be absent for the entire academic year as part of the fallout from the hazing death of drum major Robert Champion. Champion died following a hazing ritual that took place following FAMU’s last football game of 2011.

Twelve former band members have been charged with felony hazing in connection with Champion’s beating. All have pleaded not guilty.

The scandal has nearly paralyzed the school. The band has been suspended, and the longtime band director and university president have resigned. The school is being sued by Champion’s parents, who say university officials ignored a culture of hazing.

University officials have responded by putting in a long line of new policies, including new requirements for band membership and new requirements for all students at the school.

But more immediately the university is trying to figure out how to entertain a fan base accustomed to dancing in the stands as the band played. They have turned to rappers, high school bands and DJs in an attempt to keep up attendance.

Al Lawson, an alumnus of FAMU and former state legislator, said the absence of the band had "left a void," and he was unsure the university could fill it.

"A lot of the fans as long as I remember say, ‘I don’t really come for the game but for the show at halftime,’" Lawson said. "It’s a major, major challenge."

Lawson noted the university has worked hard in the weeks before the first home game against Hampton by reaching out to alumni and those who own local businesses to encourage them to come to the game. Lawson said he even bought extra season tickets this year.


story continues below
story continues below

"The (National Football League) has proven you don’t need a band at halftime to draw fans," he said.

The first halftime without the band will feature Future, an up-and-coming hip-hop artist whose songs are getting plenty of airplay on urban radio stations. There will also be a DJ battle to keep the fans entertained.

"This is an exciting time for FAMU football, and the athletics program has created an energetic and vibrant halftime production to give fans and supporters a spectacular experience," said Derek Horne, the FAMU athletics director.

But the first home game follows a week in which FAMU filed court papers saying that it cannot be blamed for the death of the 26-year-old Champion. The university says Champion knew the dangers of hazing — and even witnessed fellow band members getting hazed — but agreed to participate anyway.

For Pam Champion, the first home game without The Marching 100 is a bittersweet reminder that her son is dead.

"Unfortunately, my son is not going to be there with the band. Otherwise I would be at the game," Pam Champion said at a news conference this week in Atlanta.

"In the midst of all the history of that school, with the conduct that has been going on in that band, here’s a moment to reflect that the whole thing is about the safety of the students, and until they address that, there is no reason that the band should be there."



Copyright 2014 The Salt Lake Tribune. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Top Reader Comments Read All Comments Post a Comment
Click here to read all comments   Click here to post a comment


About Reader Comments


Reader comments on sltrib.com are the opinions of the writer, not The Salt Lake Tribune. We will delete comments containing obscenities, personal attacks and inappropriate or offensive remarks. Flagrant or repeat violators will be banned. If you see an objectionable comment, please alert us by clicking the arrow on the upper right side of the comment and selecting "Flag comment as inappropriate". If you've recently registered with Disqus or aren't seeing your comments immediately, you may need to verify your email address. To do so, visit disqus.com/account.
See more about comments here.
Staying Connected
Videos
Jobs
Contests and Promotions
  • Search Obituaries
  • Place an Obituary

  • Search Cars
  • Search Homes
  • Search Jobs
  • Search Marketplace
  • Search Legal Notices

  • Other Services
  • Advertise With Us
  • Subscribe to the Newspaper
  • Access your e-Edition
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Contact a newsroom staff member
  • Access the Trib Archives
  • Privacy Policy
  • Missing your paper? Need to place your paper on vacation hold? For this and any other subscription related needs, click here or call 801.204.6100.