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A Chinese man holds up a piece of paper with the words " Diaoyu island belongs to China, Japanese get out" as he protests with others outside the Japanese embassy in Beijing, China Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2012. Chinese government ships are patrolling near contested East China Sea islands in a show of anger after Tokyo moved to assert its control in the area. Beijing warned Monday that Japan would suffer unspecified consequences if Tokyo purchased the islands from private owners, as it formally did Tuesday.(AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
China sends patrol ships to islands held by Japan
Territorial dispute » The two tiny islands have been the focus of spats between the countries and also are claimed by Taiwan.
First Published Sep 11 2012 12:26 pm • Last Updated Sep 11 2012 03:31 pm

Beijing • A territorial flare-up between China and Japan intensified Tuesday as two Beijing-sent patrol ships arrived near disputed East China Sea islands in a show of anger over Tokyo’s purchase of the largely barren outcroppings from their private owners.

The China Marine Surveillance has drawn up a plan to safeguard China’s sovereignty of the islands and the ships were sent to assert those claims, said the Chinese government’s official news agency, Xinhua. The marine agency is a paramilitary force whose ships are often lightly armed.

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The rocky islands, known as Senkaku to Japanese and Diaoyu to Chinese, have been the focus of recurring spats between the countries and also are claimed by Taiwan. The China-Japan dispute has been heating up in recent months, in part because the nationalist governor of Tokyo proposed buying the islands and developing them.

Japan’s central government announced its own deal this week with the Japanese family it recognizes as the owner. Chief Cabinet Secretary Osamu Fujimura told reporters the government budgeted 2.05 billion yen ($26 million) for the purchase "to maintain the Senkakus peacefully and stably."

Public broadcaster NHK said the government and the family signed a deal Tuesday.

The central government does not plan to develop the islands. Several experts interpreted the move as an attempt to block the plan by Tokyo Gov. Shintaro Ishihara, which could have raised tensions further. Ishihara also had said he hoped to visit the islands in October.

"Ishihara put the national government in a very difficult spot. He pushed them into doing this now," said Sheila Smith, a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations in Washington. But she said this was a "good outcome" that should be seen as an attempt by Tokyo to sideline Ishihara.

Japan cannot afford to let the dispute hinder its vital ties with China, its top trading partner, she said.

Smith said Tokyo needs to be able to work through "different problems with Beijing in order to make sure the economic interdependence between those two countries continues to serve both nations’ needs."

Beijing, however, responded with fury.


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"The determination and the will of the Chinese government and military to safeguard their territorial integrity are firm," Chinese Defense Ministry spokesman Geng Yansheng said in a statement. "We are closely monitoring the development of the situation and reserve the right to take necessary measures."

Japan has claimed the islands since 1895. The U.S. took jurisdiction after World War II and turned them over to Japan in 1972. But Beijing sees the purchase as an affront to its claims and its past calls for negotiations.

The United States steered clear of wading into the dispute, and just urged the two sides to resolve it through dialogue. Japan is a staunch U.S. ally, but Washington says it does not take a position on the conflicting territorial claims. It also does not want to further strain its own relations with China.

"In the current environment we want cooler heads to prevail," Kurt Campbell, the top U.S. diplomat for East Asia, said in Washington. "This (the Asia-Pacific) is the cockpit of the global economy and the stakes could not be bigger. The desire is for all leaders to keep that in mind."

Carlyle Thayer, an expert on regional security at the University of New South Wales in Australia, said the sending of the Chinese patrol boats "ups the stakes."

"It’s a tit-for-tat response because China is extremely sensitive about sovereignty matters," he said.

Japan’s coast guard said it has not taken any special measures in response to the Chinese patrol boats although it continues to monitor the situation.

Thayer said the Chinese boats would likely stop short of entering the 12 nautical miles around the islands that are considered territorial waters and administered by Japan.

"Japan has a pretty robust navy, a very strong and active professional coast guard. What is possible are the kinds of confrontations like occurred at Scarborough Shoal," a disputed reef where Chinese and Philippine boats faced off earlier this year.

"It’s all posturing. It’s a game of who blinks first," Thayer said.

Beijing’s anger has been accompanied by heated reporting in China’s state media. Reactions to Japanese actions are sometimes overstated in China, and a commentator in the People’s Liberation Army Daily, the main newspaper of China’s military, called Japan’s move "the most blatant challenge to China’s sovereignty since the end of World War II." China on Tuesday also started broadcasting a daily marine weather report for the islands.

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