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This NOAA satellite image taken Saturday, June 23, 2012, shows shower and thunderstorm activity developing around an area of low pressure spinning in the Gulf of Mexico. Tropical Storm Debby has formed in the Gulf of Mexico and forecasters say it will bring rain to the Gulf coast from southern Louisiana to the Florida Panhandle. (AP Photo/NOAA)
Tropical Storm Debby marks first time four storms have formed before July

First Published Jun 23 2012 07:49 pm • Last Updated Jun 23 2012 07:49 pm

Miami • Tropical Storm Debby formed in the Gulf of Mexico on Saturday, interfering with oil and gas production and putting officials on alert for flooding and strong winds from Texas to Florida. It marks the first time that four storms have formed before July.

At least one tornado linked to the storm touched down in southwest Florida, but no injuries were reported. The storm’s outer rain bands were pounding parts of the state.

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Debby was about 220 miles south of the mouth of the Mississippi River, with maximum sustained winds of 50 mph.

The center of Debby was expected to linger over the northern Gulf during the next few days with no landfall in the immediate forecast.

While the storm’s track is far from certain, the National Hurricane Center has Debby skirting the Louisiana coast and heading west toward Texas. Some strengthening is expected over the next couple of days.

Forecasters warned of up to 6 inches of rain along the coast, with isolated amounts of 10 inches.

It was the first time four tropical storms have been recorded before July 1 during the Atlantic hurricane season since record keeping began in 1851.

Debby forced the suspension of 8 percent of the region’s oil and gas production.

The government reported that nine production platforms and one drilling rig were evacuated. The suspended crude production amounts to about 2 percent of U.S production and about 0.1 percent of global production. The reduced production is not expected to impact oil prices unless the storm strengthens and forces more production platforms to close.

A tropical storm warning was issued for part of the southeast Louisiana coast. Officials there have been monitoring the weather closely for the last several days. Some low-lying areas close to the coast flood easily in rough weather.


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"We’ve already seen higher tides than usual," said Angela Rains, manager of the Terrebonne Levee District.

Near the mouth of the Mississippi southeast of New Orleans, Plaquemines Parish President Billy Nungesser said officials were making preparations to protect the main highway from tidal flooding.

A tornado touched down in Collier County in southwest Florida and forecasters warned other twisters were possible.

Several homes were damaged and tree limbs were down, The Naples Daily News reported.

"This is quite common with this type of storm," senior hurricane specialist Stacy Stewart with the National Hurricane Center said of the twisters. "They tend to not be very large or long-lived, which can be difficult to detect on radar. So people need to keep an eye on the sky."

Out in the Gulf, Anadarko Petroleum removed all non-essential personnel and expects to close four facilities in the central and eastern Gulf by Saturday. Chevron, Royal Dutch Shell and Marathon Oil said non-essential personnel were being removed but production was not being affected. ExxonMobil reported that its operations were unaffected.

Alberto was the first storm this year. It formed off the South Carolina coast on May 19, almost two weeks before the hurricane season officially began June 1.



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