Quantcast
Get breaking news alerts via email

Click here to manage your alerts
US Airways flight lands in Maine over odd passenger behavior
Flight from Paris » US Airways jetliner lands safely after passenger reportedly says she has a surgically implanted device.
First Published May 22 2012 11:33 am • Last Updated May 22 2012 01:17 pm

Bangor, Maine » A US Airways jet traveling from Paris to North Carolina was diverted to Maine on Tuesday after a French passenger handed a note to a flight attendant mentioning that she had a surgically implanted device, raising security concerns, officials said.

An examination by doctors aboard the plane found that the passenger, a French citizen born in Cameroon, had no scars, U.S. Rep. Peter King said. The woman was traveling alone without any checked baggage and intended to stay in the U.S. for 10 days, he said.

Join the Discussion
Post a Comment

The FBI and Homeland Security Department warned airlines last summer that terrorists are considering surgically hiding bombs inside humans to evade airport security.

Two F-15 fighters scrambled to escort Flight 787 with 179 passengers and nine crew members to Bangor International Airport, where it landed shortly after noon Tuesday.

With the passenger in custody of law enforcement, the Boeing 767 was cleared several hours later to continue to its final destination in Charlotte, N.C.

The Transportation Security Administration issued a statement saying it was aware of "a passenger who exhibited suspicious behavior" during the flight.

"Out of an abundance of caution, the flight was diverted to (Bangor) where it was met by law enforcement. The passenger in question is being interviewed by U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers," said TSA spokesman Sterling Payne.

The plane was met by state, local and federal law enforcement officers when it landed in Bangor, FBI spokesman Greg Comcowich said.

The Bangor airport is accustomed to dealing with diverted flights.

It’s the first large U.S. airport for incoming European flights and the last U.S. airport for outgoing flights, with uncluttered skies and one of the longest runways on the East Coast. Aircraft use the airport when there are mechanical problems, medical emergencies or unruly passengers.


story continues below
story continues below

Associated Press writers Eileen Sullivan in Washington, Denise Lavoie in Boston, and David Sharp and Clarke Canfield in Portland, Maine, contributed to this report.



Copyright 2014 The Salt Lake Tribune. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Top Reader Comments Read All Comments Post a Comment
Click here to read all comments   Click here to post a comment


About Reader Comments


Reader comments on sltrib.com are the opinions of the writer, not The Salt Lake Tribune. We will delete comments containing obscenities, personal attacks and inappropriate or offensive remarks. Flagrant or repeat violators will be banned. If you see an objectionable comment, please alert us by clicking the arrow on the upper right side of the comment and selecting "Flag comment as inappropriate". If you've recently registered with Disqus or aren't seeing your comments immediately, you may need to verify your email address. To do so, visit disqus.com/account.
See more about comments here.
Staying Connected
Videos
Jobs
Contests and Promotions
  • Search Obituaries
  • Place an Obituary

  • Search Cars
  • Search Homes
  • Search Jobs
  • Search Marketplace
  • Search Legal Notices

  • Other Services
  • Advertise With Us
  • Subscribe to the Newspaper
  • Access your e-Edition
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Contact a newsroom staff member
  • Access the Trib Archives
  • Privacy Policy
  • Missing your paper? Need to place your paper on vacation hold? For this and any other subscription related needs, click here or call 801.204.6100.