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California prison panel denies Charles Manson’s bid for parole
12th attempt » Manson and his followers were convicted in the 1969 slaying of actress Sharon Tate and four others.


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CORCORAN, Calif. • A California prison panel denied parole Wednesday to mass murderer Charles Manson in his 12th and possibly final bid for freedom.

Manson, now a gray-bearded 77-year-old, did not attend the hearing where the parole board ruled he had shown no efforts to rehabilitate himself and would not be eligible for parole for another 15 years.

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"This panel can find nothing good as far as suitability factors go," said John Peck, a member of the panel that met at Corcoran State Prison in Central California.

Manson orchestrated a series of gruesome murders on consecutive nights in Los Angeles 40 years ago. His trial with three women acolytes was an international spectacle.

Manson and his followers were convicted in the 1969 slaying of actress Sharon Tate and four others.

"I’m done with him," Debra Tate, the sister of the actress, said after the hearing.

For four decades, Debra Tate has traveled to whatever rural California prison has held the notorious cult leader and his band of murderous followers for hearings she said are too numerous to count.

"I’ve tried to take this thing that I do, that has become my lot in life, and make it have purpose," the 59-year-old Tate said Tuesday. She was 17 in August 1969, when Manson sent his minions across LA on two nights of terror.

"I’ve been doing it for Sharon and the other victims of him for the last 40 years," she said.

Under current law, inmates can be denied the chance to reapply for parole for up to 15 years. The ruling Wednesday would make Manson 92 before he could get another opportunity to make his case.


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"At his age, I think he doesn’t care," Deputy District Attorney Patrick Sequeira has said. "He would be lost if he got out. He’s completely institutionalized."

Manson has not appeared at a parole hearing since 1997. His most recent hearing was in 2007.

Manson, however, is anything but a recluse. He has a steady stream of visitors who submit requests to see him, including college students writing papers about him, said Theresa Cisneros, spokeswoman for Corcoran State Prison.

Manson must approve all requests.

"He has a large interested public," Cisneros said, adding that Manson receives more mail than most prisoners.

Manson has been cited twice for having smuggled cellphones. Authorities found he had been talking with people in California, New Jersey, Florida, British Columbia, Arkansas, Massachusetts and Indiana.

The phone numbers were traced, but Department of Corrections spokeswoman Terry Thornton said she could not disclose who received the calls.

Manson also was cited in October for having a homemade weapon in his cell.

Manson was depicted at trial as the evil master of murder, commanding a small army of young followers. He and the three women were sentenced to death. But their lives were spared when the California Supreme Court briefly outlawed the death penalty in 1972.

One of them, Susan Atkins, died in prison. Two others, Leslie Van Houten and Patricia Krenwinkel, remain incarcerated.



Copyright 2014 The Salt Lake Tribune. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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