Prep boys soccer: Murray's Andrew Clayton adds scoring punch

Published May 22, 2013 3:48 pm

Prep boys soccer • Clayton scored nine of Murray's 30 goals during the regular season.
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Andrew Clayton's odds of sharing some traits with his brothers and sisters seem since he grew up with seven siblings — three younger and four older.

Yet he might just be on a different path from the rest of the Clayton clan, according to the Murray High senior.

As his high-school days come to an end, Clayton is pretty sure that he'll pursue either an engineering or medical career in the long run. In the short term, he's finishing his prep days where he's seen good success on the Spartans' soccer team and where he picked up wrestling as "kind of a high-school hobby."

The rest of his family has more of an artistic rather than athletic proclivity.

"I don't know, I guess I just missed out on it," Clayton said about the artistic side.

Clayton finished the regular season as a major goal contributor for Murray, scoring nine of the team's 30 scores. He plans to attend Westminster College on an academic scholarship in the fall, when he hopes to join a couple of teammates from his club team on the pitch.

It was his involvement in that team, Murray Max, that pushed Clayton in the direction of Murray High in the first place. Clayton, who was home schooled until the ninth grade, lived on the Taylorsville side of the city boundary between Murray and Taylorsville. Fellow members of the Murray Max were heading off to be Spartans, which helped Clayton make his decision. And it's a choice he hasn't regretted, particularly not at the end of his senior season.

"I think we've played better this year than we've done the last four years," Clayton said.

"Andrew's a great young man," Murray coach Bryan DeMann said. "He's somewhat quiet, but a very intense hard worker. He's just the type of kid who's totally committed, the kind that has to be convinced to sit out if he's injured."