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Prep baseball: Hillcrest holds on vs. Olympus

Published April 11, 2013 9:32 am

Zak Zimmerman provides both offense, solid relief pitching.
This is an archived article that was published on sltrib.com in 2013, and information in the article may be outdated. It is provided only for personal research purposes and may not be reprinted.

Hillcrest's 11-7 victory over Olympus was a two-part play with senior Zak Zimmerman starring at center stage.

The 6-4 senior started the game in right field. Batting seventh in the lineup, the left-handed senior stood tall over the plate with his bat poised high. His pant legs were crisp white as he jacked back-to-back home runs in the first and third. Trotting the four-baggers out, Zimmerman looked like he barely broke a sweat putting Hillcrest up 10-1 by the fifth.

"When you see those pitches coming down the pipe, you just got to swing on them," Zimmerman said.

Hillcrest starting pitcher VJ Vincon was in control through five innings, throwing a combination of changeups and fastballs to keep the Titans off-balance.

However, Vincon got into a jam when the Olympus bats came alive. After allowing four to score, Vincon was pulled and Zimmerman was called upon.

Inheriting two runners, Zimmerman swapped gloves and got to work. He knew that he had to stop the rally and get the Huskies out of the inning.

"I think of myself as a pitcher," Zimmerman said. "When coach brought me in, I just wanted to do the work and help my team."

The next two Titans were struck out. Hillcrest catcher Ben Farar was impressed with Zimmerman's ability to get out of the inning.

"Zak came in and threw really hard. Olympus were out in front a lot more on Zak's curve," Farar said. "Zak's curve was breaking awesome."

Zimmerman retired the side in the sixth with two more strikeouts and digging out a come-backer for the easy play at first.

While Hillcrest was able to hold on for the win, Farar cautioned his team for losing concentration.

"When we have the lead, we need to make sure that we don't make the mental errors," Farar said. "We got to put them away when we get the chance."