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NCAA board hands 5 biggest conferences more power

First Published Aug 07 2014 11:37AM      Last Updated Aug 07 2014 11:40 pm

NCAA President Mark Emmert gestures while speaking at NCAA headquarters in Indianapolis, Thursday, Aug. 7, 2014. The NCAA Board of Directors overwhelmingly approved a package of historic reforms Thursday that will give the nation's five biggest conferences the ability to unilaterally change some of the basic rules governing college sports. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy)

Indianapolos • The NCAA Board of Directors overwhelmingly approved a package of historic reforms Thursday that will give the nation’s five biggest conferences the ability to unilaterally change some of the basic rules governing college sports.

If the 16-2 decision stands, there will be striking differences between the 65 largest schools and the more than 280 others in Division I beginning as early as Oct. 1, though few expect change to come that quickly.

"I am immensely proud of the work done by the membership," NCAA President Mark Emmert said. "The new governance model represents a compromise on all sides that will better serve our members and, most importantly, our student-athletes. These changes will help all our schools better support the young people who come to college to play sports while earning a degree."



Representatives from the five richest leagues — the ACC, Big Ten, Big 12, Pac-12 and SEC — will hold nearly twice as much voting power (37.5 percent) as any other group on a newly created council, where most legislation will be approved or rejected. The five other Football Bowl Subdivision leagues would account for 18.5 percent while the second-tier Football Championship Subdivision and non-football playing schools would split up another 37.5 percent of the vote. Athletes and faculty will account for the rest.

Pac-12 commissioner Larry Scott called the NCAA vote a great moment for his conference — which includes the University of Utah — and the other power leagues.

"We are delighted that after years of debate, a consensus has emerged that the time has come for a mod-ern approach to governance that recognizes the need to give more flexibility to those conferences pre-pared to do more for student-athletes and, at the same time, preserves the collegiate model which works so well for the vast majority of Pac-12 student-athletes," Scott said in a statement. "This is a great day for the 7,000 current student-athletes in the Pac-12 and for generations of future student-athletes who will benefit from the educational opportunities and life lessons made possible by college athletics."

However, Utah Sen. Orrin Hatch has questions about the NCAA Thursday action, and says congressional review may be warranted. He fears non-power conference schools — including Brigham Young University and Utah State University — could be harmed by the reforms.

"The NCAA should be responsible for promoting fair competition among its participating institutions and their student athletes. I am concerned that today’s action could create an uneven playing field that may prevent some institutions from being able to compete fairly with other schools that have superior resources to pay for student athletes," Hatch said in statement. "I also worry about how this decision will affect a school’s Title IX requirements and whether this consolidation of power will restrict competition and warrant antitrust scrutiny. As a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, I’ll be examining the NCAA’s Redesign Model closely to determine if action must be taken to ensure that competition in college athletics among all colleges is preserved."

Scott also said he is pleased that this major step forward was possible within the larger tent of Division I college athletics.

 

 

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