Quantcast
Get breaking news alerts via email

Click here to manage your alerts
Cattle are seen at Darrel Sweet's ranch in Livermore, Calif., Tuesday, March 29, 2005. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez). Bill Gates is funding the development of condoms made out of alternative substances, including beef.
Mexican soccer players banned from eating beef
First Published May 24 2014 11:21 pm • Last Updated May 24 2014 11:21 pm

Mexico City • Mexican World Cup players may be asking: Where’s the beef?

The Mexican players are being banned from eating beef, a move aimed at avoiding positive doping tests from meat contaminated with the performance-enhancing drug clenbuterol.

Join the Discussion
Post a Comment

Coach Miguel Herrera said Wednesday he had told his players more than a month ago not to eat red meat.

During the 2011 Gold Cup, five Mexico players tested positive for clenbuterol, a muscle-building drug. The Mexican Football Federation eventually cleared the players of doping. The World Anti-Doping Agency accepted what it termed "compelling evidence" that meat in Mexico was contaminated with clenbuterol and produced the positive tests.

"Our training center has determined, based on what happened in the past, that red meat shouldn’t be eaten," Herrera said.

Mexican authorities have acknowledged that the drug, which is banned in the sports world, has been used in the country to fatten cattle. Defender Miguel Ponce, who was left off the original 23-man team, said he had been eating some red meat. He was added to the team recently to replace injured midfielder Juan Carlos Medina.

"I ate a few tacos, but I hope there is no problem," Ponce said. "From now on I’ll follow what’s been requested."

Mexico plays its first match at the World Cup in Natal against Cameroon on June 13, faces Brazil on June 17 in Fortaleza in its most difficult game in Group A, and will then play Croatia on June 23 in Recife.

Brazil is the clear favorite to win the group and advance to the knockout stage. Second place in the group seems wide open.




Copyright 2014 The Salt Lake Tribune. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Top Reader Comments Read All Comments Post a Comment
Click here to read all comments   Click here to post a comment


About Reader Comments


Reader comments on sltrib.com are the opinions of the writer, not The Salt Lake Tribune. We will delete comments containing obscenities, personal attacks and inappropriate or offensive remarks. Flagrant or repeat violators will be banned. If you see an objectionable comment, please alert us by clicking the arrow on the upper right side of the comment and selecting "Flag comment as inappropriate". If you've recently registered with Disqus or aren't seeing your comments immediately, you may need to verify your email address. To do so, visit disqus.com/account.
See more about comments here.
Staying Connected
Videos
Jobs
Contests and Promotions
  • Search Obituaries
  • Place an Obituary

  • Search Cars
  • Search Homes
  • Search Jobs
  • Search Marketplace
  • Search Legal Notices

  • Other Services
  • Advertise With Us
  • Subscribe to the Newspaper
  • Access your e-Edition
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Contact a newsroom staff member
  • Access the Trib Archives
  • Privacy Policy
  • Missing your paper? Need to place your paper on vacation hold? For this and any other subscription related needs, click here or call 801.204.6100.