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Louisville head coach Rick Pitino talks to his players during practice for the NCAA Midwest Regional semifinal college basketball tournament game Thursday, March 27, 2014, in Indianapolis. Louisville plays Kentucky on Friday, March 28, 2013. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
College basketball: Veteran Louisville, young Kentucky rekindle Bluegrass rivalry in Sweet 16
First Published Mar 27 2014 06:45 pm • Last Updated Mar 27 2014 11:17 pm

Indianapolis • John Calipari sent Andrew and Aaron Harrison and three other freshmen to sit behind the microphones and answer questions about Kentucky’s upcoming Sweet 16 matchup against Bluegrass State rival Louisville.

Rick Pitino sent up seniors Russ Smith and Luke Hancock.

At a glance

Schedule

O Friday

Regional semifinals

Michigan (27-8) vs. Tennessee (24-12), 5:15 p.m., Ch. 2

» Kentucky (26-10) vs. Louisville (31-5), 7:45 p.m., Ch. 2

Regional championship

Sunday

» Semifinal winners, TBA

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That, as much as the 70 miles that separates the schools, is the gulf between the neighbors who play Friday in one of the most important meetings in their long, colorful and not-so-friendly rivalry.

Eighth-seeded Kentucky plays the one-and-done game and won a title that way in 2012. Fourth-seeded Louisville goes for a more long-term approach and took home its own championship trophy last season.

"There’s so many arguments," Pitino said. "I think the best of all worlds, me personally, I would like to see exactly what football has."

Whether they stay a minimum of three years (football), one year (basketball) or something else, the issue of how athletes fit into a college campus was thrust into the spotlight by this week’s National Labor Relations Board decision that defined football players at Northwestern as employees. Neither coach would bite when asked how they felt about the ruling. "Has nothing to do with this game, so I leave it alone," Calipari said.

But both are well aware of the business side of their game that fosters the tenuous relationships between players, coaches and schools. The one-and-done rule has been key in Calipari’s re-emergence as a Final Four coach over the last six years, and has weighed on the minds of other coaches, like Pitino, who don’t land the NBA-ready kids as frequently but often find themselves competing against them.

"I think we’re all playing the hand we’re dealt," Calipari said. "Kids are going on to the league from us and performing, and I’m proud of that. Would I like to have had them for four years? Yes. But I also like what’s happened for them and their families."




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