Quantcast
Get breaking news alerts via email

Click here to manage your alerts
(FILE - In this Monday, Feb. 10, 2014 file photo, Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher Zack Greinke throws during spring training baseball practice in Glendale, Ariz. Greinke and the Los Angeles Dodgers have knocked Rodriguez and the New York Yankees off baseball's payroll perch. The Dodgers as of Tuesday, March 25, 2014 had a projected payroll of $235 million, according to study of all major league contracts by The Associated Press) . (AP Photo/Paul Sancya, File)
MLB: Dodgers top Yankees with $4M average salaries
First Published Mar 26 2014 09:16 am • Last Updated Mar 28 2014 05:29 pm

New York • Zack Greinke and the Los Angeles Dodgers have knocked Alex Rodriguez and the New York Yankees off baseball’s payroll perch, part of an offseason spending spree that has the average salary approaching $4 million for the first time.

The Dodgers are ending the Yankees’ 15-year streak as baseball’s biggest spenders and as of Tuesday had a projected payroll of $235 million, according to study of all major league contracts by The Associated Press.

At a glance

2014 Baseball Projected Payrolls

New York » Projected payrolls for the 30 major league teams. Figures were obtained by The Associated Press from management and player sources and include salaries and pro-rated shares of signing bonuses for players on the 25-man active roster, disabled lists and restricted list as of 2 p.m. EDT March 25, plus players teams have committed to putting on their rosters. In some cases, parts of salaries deferred without interest are discounted to reflect present-day values. Adjustments have been made for cash transactions in trades, signing bonuses that are responsibility of club that agreed to contract, option buyouts and termination pay for released players.

Team         Payroll

Los Angeles Dodgers $235,295,219

N.Y. Yankees   202,812,506

Philadelphia   180,052,723

Boston   162,817,411

Detroit   162,228,527

Los Angeles Angels   155,692,000

San Francisco   154,185,878

Texas   136,036,172

Washington   134,704,437

Toronto   132,628,700

Arizona   112,688,666

Cincinnati   112,390,772

St. Louis   111,020,360

Atlanta   110,897,341

Baltimore   107,406,623

Milwaukee   103,844,806

Colorado     95,832,071

Seattle     92,081,943

Kansas City     92,034,345

Chicago White Sox     91,159,254

San Diego     90,094,196

New York Mets     89,051,758

Chicago Cubs     89,007,857

Minnesota     85,776,500

Oakland     83,401,400

Cleveland     82,534,800

Pittsburgh     78,111,667

Tampa Bay     77,062,891

Miami     47,565,400

Houston     44,544,174

Join the Discussion
Post a Comment

New York, which last failed to top the payroll rankings in 1998, was a distant second at $203 million. After that, it was another huge gap to Philadelphia at $180 million, followed by Boston at $163 million and Detroit at $162 million.

Houston is last at $45 million, up from $27 million at the start of last year, and Miami at $48 million remains 29th.

Some large-market teams are among the smaller spenders, with the New York Mets and Chicago Cubs projected at $89 million, ranked 22nd and 23rd.

Rodriguez, who holds the record for the largest deal in baseball history at $275 million over 10 years, is suspended for the season for violations of baseball’s drug agreement and labor contract. Because of the ban, he will earn only $2,868,852 of his $25 million salary — 21 days pay for the 183-day season.

Greinke would have become the highest-paid player, even if Rodriguez was getting all his cash. The pitcher has a $24 million salary in the second season of his $147 million, six-year contract, and because he can opt out of the deal after the 2015 season, baseball’s accounting rules call for his $12 million signing bonus to be prorated over ‘the first three seasons.

"We’ve got great ownership and a great fan base, and we need to do what we can to win games," Dodgers general manager Ned Colletti said last week in Sydney, where Los Angeles swept its opening, two-game series against Arizona.

"I don’t think the guys worry about it. I know we don’t worry about it," Colletti said. "We’re expected to win, and that’s how we go about it. Money doesn’t mean you win. Money just means you have a chance to get the best players."

As of Tuesday, the average salary projected to be between $3.95 million and $4 million, with the final figure depending on how many players are put on the disabled list by the time opening-day rosters are finalized at 3 p.m. Sunday. That translates to a rise of 8 to 10 percent from last year’s opening average of $3.65 million and would be the largest increase since 2006 or possibly even 2001.


story continues below
story continues below

"I’m not surprised. With the type of revenues clubs are enjoying these days, the average salaries are going to go up," New York Mets general manager Sandy Alderson said.

Illustrating the rate of escalation, the opening-day average was $1.07 million when Derek Jeter first reached the major leagues in 1995, broke the $2 million mark in 2001 and spurted past $3 million in 2008.

"I think it’s great. I think it just shows the game is growing, fan interest is there," said Jeter, the Yankees captain who is retiring at the end of this season. "The business of baseball seems like it’s booming pretty good right now."

The average U.S. wage in 2012 was $42,498, according to the Social Security Administration, the latest figure available and an annual increase of 3.12 percent.

Following Greinke on the highest-paid list are Philadelphia’s Ryan Howard and Cliff Lee at $25 million, the Yankees’ CC Sabathia at $24.3 million, and Seattle’s Robinson Cano and Texas’ Prince Fielder at $24 million each.

The AP’s figures include salaries and prorated shares of signing bonuses and other guaranteed income for players on active rosters, disabled lists and the restricted list. For some players, parts of deferred money are discounted to reflect current values.

Payroll figures factor in adjustments for cash transactions in trades, signing bonuses that are the responsibility of the club agreeing to the contract, option buyouts, and termination pay for released players.

For instance, the Yankees are receiving $18.6 million from the Los Angeles Angels to cover most of the $21 million due to outfielder Vernon Wells, who has been released, and $13 million from the Chicago Cubs to pay most of the $18 million owed outfielder Alfonso Soriano. The Mets’ payroll include buyouts to Johan Santana ($4.9 million present value) and Jason Bay ($2.7 million present value).

———

AP Sports Writer Dennis Passa and AP freelance writers Mark Didtler and Jon Santucci contributed to this report.



Copyright 2014 The Salt Lake Tribune. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Top Reader Comments Read All Comments Post a Comment
Click here to read all comments   Click here to post a comment


About Reader Comments


Reader comments on sltrib.com are the opinions of the writer, not The Salt Lake Tribune. We will delete comments containing obscenities, personal attacks and inappropriate or offensive remarks. Flagrant or repeat violators will be banned. If you see an objectionable comment, please alert us by clicking the arrow on the upper right side of the comment and selecting "Flag comment as inappropriate". If you've recently registered with Disqus or aren't seeing your comments immediately, you may need to verify your email address. To do so, visit disqus.com/account.
See more about comments here.
Staying Connected
Videos
Jobs
Contests and Promotions
  • Search Obituaries
  • Place an Obituary

  • Search Cars
  • Search Homes
  • Search Jobs
  • Search Marketplace
  • Search Legal Notices

  • Other Services
  • Advertise With Us
  • Subscribe to the Newspaper
  • Access your e-Edition
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Contact a newsroom staff member
  • Access the Trib Archives
  • Privacy Policy
  • Missing your paper? Need to place your paper on vacation hold? For this and any other subscription related needs, click here or call 801.204.6100.