Quantcast
Get breaking news alerts via email

Click here to manage your alerts
FILE - in a Sept. 14, 2013 file photo, New York Yankees' Derek Jeter looks on from the dugout during their 5-1 loss to the Boston Red Sox in a baseball game at Fenway Park in Boston. Jeter has taken on-field batting practice for the first time since his 2013 season was cut short by injuries, on Monday, Feb. 3, 2014. Jeter hit with authority to all fields during a five-round, 39-swing session Monday at the Yankees' minor league complex. Jeter also took grounders at shortstop for the first time this year, fielding 34 balls at his usual position. (AP Photo/Winslow Townson, File)
MLB: Yankees star Jeter to retire after 2014 season

By Ben Walker

The Associated Press

First Published Feb 12 2014 12:27 pm • Last Updated Feb 12 2014 08:05 pm

New York » To Derek Jeter, it was just another day to get ready for spring training.

On a minor league field at the New York Yankees’ complex in Florida, he took batting practice, fielded grounders and chatted with teammates. And then he drove away in his Mercedes, offering no hint that the countdown to his retirement had already begun.

Join the Discussion
Post a Comment

Hours later, Jeter alerted the sports world: This will be his final season.

"I know it in my heart. The 2014 season will be my last year playing professional baseball," Jeter posted Wednesday in a long letter on his Facebook page.

"I have gotten the very most out of my life playing baseball, and I have absolutely no regrets," the shortstop wrote.

While it was no secret the team captain was getting close to the end of his brilliant career as he neared 40 — especially after injuries wrecked him last season — Jeter’s announcement caught many by surprise.

In fact, some people wondered whether his account had been hacked. But it was quickly confirmed that one of the greatest players in the history of baseball’s most storied franchise was serious.

A 13-time All-Star shortstop who led the Yankees to five World Series championships, Jeter was the last link to the powerful Yankees teams that won three straight crowns from 1998-2000. Longtime teammates Mariano Rivera and Andy Pettitte retired after last year.

"Derek Jeter is Mr. Yankee of his era," Yankees co-chairman Hank Steinbrenner told The Associated Press. "He was the face of one of the greatest teams ever."

Jeter was limited to 17 games last season while trying to recover from a broken left ankle sustained during the 2012 playoffs. He hit only .190 with one homer and seven RBIs.


story continues below
story continues below

"Last year was a tough one for me. As I suffered through a bunch of injuries, I realized that some of the things that always came easily to me and were always fun had started to become a struggle," Jeter wrote. "The one thing I always said to myself was that when baseball started to feel more like a job, it would be time to move forward."

"So really it was months ago when I realized that this season would likely be my last. As I came to this conclusion and shared it with my friends and family, they all told me to hold off saying anything until I was absolutely 100 percent sure," he wrote.

"And the thing is, I could not be more sure," he wrote.

His agent, Casey Close, said Jeter wanted to declare his intentions before the Yankees start spring training later this week so that his future status wouldn’t be a distraction.

The Yankees open camp for pitchers and catchers on Friday. Jeter has said he’s healthy and ready to go — at 39, his next birthday is in June.

"Derek called me this morning to tell me that he planned to retire following the season," Yankees Managing General Partner Hal Steinbrenner said.

Said Los Angeles Dodgers manager Don Mattingly, a former Jeter teammate: "I’m excited for him. It’s kind of nice to see him go out on his own terms."

Jeter is the Yankees’ career hits leader with 3,316. He’s ninth on the all-time list; a 200-hit season would put him in fifth place.

Jeter is a lifetime .312 hitter in 19 seasons, with 256 home runs and 1,261 RBIs. He has scored 1,876 runs, stolen 348 bases and is a five-time Gold Glove winner.

Added up, his numbers put him among the greats in Yankees history, with fans often invoking the names of Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Joe DiMaggio, Mickey Mantle when mentioning Jeter’s legacy.

But No. 2 is defined by so much more than his numbers. His backhanded flip in the playoffs, his diving catch into the stands, his speech to close old Yankee Stadium and his home run for career hit No. 3,000.

Next Page >


Copyright 2014 The Salt Lake Tribune. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Top Reader Comments Read All Comments Post a Comment
Click here to read all comments   Click here to post a comment


About Reader Comments


Reader comments on sltrib.com are the opinions of the writer, not The Salt Lake Tribune. We will delete comments containing obscenities, personal attacks and inappropriate or offensive remarks. Flagrant or repeat violators will be banned. If you see an objectionable comment, please alert us by clicking the arrow on the upper right side of the comment and selecting "Flag comment as inappropriate". If you've recently registered with Disqus or aren't seeing your comments immediately, you may need to verify your email address. To do so, visit disqus.com/account.
See more about comments here.
Staying Connected
Videos
Jobs
Contests and Promotions
  • Search Obituaries
  • Place an Obituary

  • Search Cars
  • Search Homes
  • Search Jobs
  • Search Marketplace
  • Search Legal Notices

  • Other Services
  • Advertise With Us
  • Subscribe to the Newspaper
  • Access your e-Edition
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Contact a newsroom staff member
  • Access the Trib Archives
  • Privacy Policy
  • Missing your paper? Need to place your paper on vacation hold? For this and any other subscription related needs, click here or call 801.204.6100.