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Charles Hamelin of Canada, left, Han Tianyu of China, centre, and Victor An of Russia compete in a men's 1500m short track speedskating final at the Iceberg Skating Palace during the 2014 Winter Olympics, Monday, Feb. 10, 2014, in Sochi, Russia. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)
Olympics: Canada’s Hamelin wins gold in 1,500 short track
Short Track » China’s Tianyu gets silver; Russia’s Ahn earns bronze
First Published Feb 10 2014 07:34 am • Last Updated Feb 10 2014 11:10 pm

Sochi, Russia • The Hamelin family of Canada got the Olympic short track competition off to a winning start.

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Charles Hamelin skated clear of the chaos that makes short track so unpredictable, winning the 1,500 meters on Monday for his third different Olympic title.

At 29, Hamelin was the oldest skater in the final. The wily veteran maintained a top-three position throughout most of the 14-lap race, leaving enough at the end to defeat a loaded field.

"He deserves it," American J.R. Celski said. "He went out there and raced his (rear) off."

Hamelin raised his arms in triumph after crossing the finish line at the Iceberg Skating Palace. He pumped his right arm through the turn and went hard into the pads to first embrace his coach and then his father Yves, the team leader for Canada.


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"It’s so many emotions," Hamelin said. "I have put so much work into it."

Hamelin will have two more chances to win individual gold in the 500 and 1,000, and he’ll be part of Canada’s team in the 5,000 relay.

Han Tianyu of China took silver. Viktor Ahn of Russia earned the bronze, giving his adopted country its first-ever short track medal. Celski, the 2010 bronze medalist from Federal Way, Wash., finished fourth.

Ahn stepped on the medals podium to wild cheers from the mostly Russian crowd. He was a three-time gold medalist for his native South Korea, but after missing the Vancouver Games four years ago because of a career-threatening injury, he changed his name and became a Russian citizen. He was known as Ahn Hyun-soo when he won gold in the 1,500 at the 2006 Turin Olympics.

"I’m so happy to have this medal," Ahn said through a translator. "I did feel the support of my fans and it played a significant role in my accomplishment. I would like to thank everyone for trusting in me."

Ahn became the second Winter Olympian to win medals for two different countries.

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