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Russian President Vladimir Putin, centre, smiles as he lights the Olympic flame with a torch, at the Red Square, Moscow, Sunday, Oct. 6, 2013. Russian President Vladimir Putin ceremoniously lit the Olympic flame on Red Square on Sunday, but the four-month relay to Sochi for the Winter Games got off to a rocky start when one of the torches went out. The Olympic flame, which was lit a week ago in Greece and flown to Moscow earlier Sunday, kept burning in a cauldron on Red Square. (AP Photo/Ivan Sekretarev)
Olympic flame relay highlights Putin’s Russia
First Published Oct 07 2013 08:16 am • Last Updated Oct 08 2013 12:03 am

Moscow • In the words of President Vladimir Putin, the four-month Olympic flame relay will "show the world Russia as she is and as we love her."

The relay for the Sochi Winter Games, which began Monday in Moscow, will pass through many cities that showcase the historical, cultural and ethnic richness of Russia. But other cities on the route will do more to remind the world of the evils of Stalinism, the harsh treatment of dissent under Putin or the Islamic insurgency simmering in the Caucasus Mountains not far from Sochi’s ski slopes. And as the relay crosses the expanses of Siberia, it will put the spotlight not only on Russia’s immense wealth of natural resources but on its rusting industrial towns.

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For most of the 65,000- kilometer (39,000-mile) trip, the flame will travel by plane, train, car and even reindeer sleigh, safely encased inside a lantern. But 14,000 torch bearers also will take part in the relay at the more than 130 stops along the way.

After leaving Moscow, the relay will make a wide, sweeping circle around the capital through some of Russia’s most historical cities before heading north toward St. Petersburg. It will then travel from the far western exclave of Kaliningrad to the easternmost point just across the Bering Strait from Alaska, before swinging back through the vast country to Sochi in time for the opening ceremony on Feb. 7.

Here is a look at some of the cities along the route:

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ST. PETERSBURG

A favorite with tourists because of its museums and palaces, St. Petersburg was founded in the early 18th century by Peter the Great and for two centuries was the capital of the Russian Empire. After the 1917 Russian Revolution, the capital was moved back to Moscow. St. Petersburg saw its star rise again when native son Vladimir Putin became president in 2000 and filled the ranks of government and business with old friends and colleagues from his hometown.

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KALININGRAD


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Kaliningrad is the capital of the westernmost region of the country, which was part of East Prussia before being absorbed into the Soviet Union after World War II. After the 1991 Soviet collapse, Kaliningrad, which sits between Poland and Lithuania, found itself cut off geographically from the rest of Russia.

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MURMANSK

Murmansk, the largest city in the world above the Arctic Circle, played an important role in the Allied victory in World War II as the port of call for U.S. and British convoys bringing in supplies to help the Soviet Union fight Nazi Germany. In more recent weeks, though, the city has made the news because of the 30 Greenpeace activists in its jails, charged with piracy after a protest at a Russian offshore oil platform.

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KHANTY-MANSIYSK

The center of a Western Siberian region where more than half of Russia’s oil is produced, Khanty-Mansiysk is a boom town in the middle of the taiga that looks more Scandinavian than Russian. The city and region were named for the indigenous people, the Khanty and Mansi, who by tradition are reindeer herders.

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MAGADAN

This northeastern city was the gateway to the most notorious Gulag labor camps under dictator Josef Stalin. The Mask of Sorrow monument in Magadan honors the tens and perhaps hundreds of thousands of people who died either en route to or in the Kolyma camps, where prisoners, many of them intellectuals, mined for gold, cut lumber or built roads during long, brutally cold winters. At the protest rallies in Moscow in the winter of 2011-12, demonstrators chanted "Putin, skis, Magadan."

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