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Sports briefs: Miami Heat release Mike Miller

Published July 16, 2013 5:29 pm

This is an archived article that was published on sltrib.com in 2013, and information in the article may be outdated. It is provided only for personal research purposes and may not be reprinted.

NBA • Mike Miller was a luxury that the Miami Heat decided they could no longer afford. Miller was designated Tuesday as the team's amnesty player, a move that may save the Heat more than $30 million in luxury tax payments over the next two years and comes only a few days after team president Pat Riley said the two-time defending NBA champions were hoping to keep the core of the roster largely intact for next season. If Miller is not claimed off waivers, he becomes a free agent later this week.

Miller spent three seasons in Miami, helping the Heat win two titles and playing big roles in each playoff run. He started the last four games of this year's NBA Finals, the highlight of that run possibly being how he lost a shoe during play early in the fourth quarter of Game 6 against San Antonio, flipped it over to the bench, came downcourt and swished a 3-pointer to help the Heat rally from 10 points down in the final 12 minutes.

Miller would have made $6.2 million this season, and $6.6 million next season. He still gets that money, but his salary will not count against Miami's cap, nor will it count against a luxury-tax hit that was in line to exceed $30 million this coming season alone.

• Brooklyn Nets coach Jason Kidd pleaded guilty Tuesday in Hampton Bays, N.Y., to a misdemeanor drunken driving charge and was placed on interim probation nearly a year after he smashed his Cadillac SUV into a utility pole on eastern Long Island. In exchange for the guilty plea, Kidd agreed to speak to high school students about the dangers of drunken driving. If he fulfills his community service, his plea will be reduced to a violation — driving while ability impaired — when he returns to court on Sept. 30.

Bobsled officials probe Jones' spat

winter sports • The U.S. Bobsled and Skeleton Federation is looking into a nightclub altercation that allegedly involved Olympic hopeful Lolo Jones. Jones reportedly argued early Saturday with a woman before bouncers at the Roomers club in Lake Placid, N.Y., separated them. Police say no charges were filed.

USBSF spokeswoman Amanda Bird says the federation is interviewing athletes and witnesses and would act if needed when the process ends. Jones did not return requests for comment.

Jones is an Olympic hurdler entering her second bobsled season.

From wire reports

Redskins want lawsuit tossed

NFL • The Washington Redskins are asking a judge to dismiss a former NFL player's lawsuit that accuses the team and former assistant coach Gregg Williams of running a bounty program that encouraged players to intentionally injure opponents. The former player, linebacker Barrett Green, says he was targeted by the Redskins during a game on Dec. 5, 2004, resulting in a career-ending knee injury. Green was playing for the New York Giants at the time. He played for New York and for the Detroit Lions between 2000 and 2005. He filed a lawsuit earlier this year against the Redskins, Williams and the player who hit him, Robert Royal. The team said in a response filed Friday in federal court in Greenbelt, Md., that Green's claims are "utterly baseless." But, even if they were true, his lawsuit is pre-empted by an NFL collective bargaining agreement and was filed too late, lawyers for the team wrote.

Packers extend safety Burnett's pact

NFL • The Green Bay Packers have locked up another defensive starter, signing safety Morgan Burnett to a long-term extension. Burnett's extension, reported by NFL.com to be worth $24.75 million over four years, follows earlier offseason deals with linebackers Clay Matthews and Brad Jones.

With Charles Woodson missing most of last season with a broken collarbone, Burnett took charge of the Packers secondary. He led the team with 123 tackles, and was one of only two defensive players in the NFL to play every snap.