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Sports briefs: PGA Tour accepts putter rule, but seek reprieve for amateurs

Published July 1, 2013 5:15 pm

This is an archived article that was published on sltrib.com in 2013, and information in the article may be outdated. It is provided only for personal research purposes and may not be reprinted.

Golf • The PGA Tour said Monday it would follow a new rule that bans the anchored putting stroke used by four of the last six major champions, asking instead for a temporary reprieve for those who play the game for fun. The announcement after a PGA Tour board meeting in Jacksonville, Fla., is the final piece of confirmation from a major golf organization for Rule 14-1b, which will take effect Jan. 1, 2016, when the next "Rules of Golf" is published. The rule makes it illegal for players to attach the end of the club to their body while making a stroke.

The Royal & Ancient Golf Club and U.S. Golf Association adopted the rule May 21. The PGA board encouraged the governing bodies to add some additional time for amateurs. Some are concerned that getting rid of the stroke for long putters will drive recreational players from golf.

Suspect returnsto Massachusetts

NFL • A man arrested in Florida agreed Monday to return to Massachusetts to face a charge in the murder case against former New England Patriots tight end Aaron Hernandez. Ernest Wallace, 41, faces a charge of accessory after the fact in the slaying of semi-pro football player Odin Lloyd. Wallace turned himself in at a Miramar, Fla., police station last week. Prosecutors say Hernandez orchestrated Lloyd's execution-style shooting near Hernandez's North Attleborough home on June 17.

UCI presidentfaces challenge

Cycling • Pat McQuaid will face one challenger as he bids for a third term as president of the sport's governing body. The International Cycling Union confirmed on Monday in Aigle, Switzerland, that Brian Cookson, president of British Cycling, will stand against McQuaid in the Sept. 27 election in Florence, Italy. Candidates had until Saturday to put their names forward. McQuaid has been UCI president since 2005 but has been under pressure since the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency report last year that led to Lance Armstrong being banned for life from cycling and stripped of his seven Tour de France titles.

From wire reports