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Justin Rose, of England, poses with the trophy after winning the U.S. Open golf tournament at Merion Golf Club, Sunday, June 16, 2013, in Ardmore, Pa. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)
Justin Rose invokes Ben Hogan on final hole of US Open
Golf » British champ faced nearly same shot as Hogan’s in 1950.
First Published Jun 17 2013 11:43 am • Last Updated Jun 29 2013 04:58 pm

Ardmore, Pa. • Justin Rose walked the 18th fairway and thought of Ben Hogan, and a chance to emulate one of the most famous shots in golf.

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That very moment Sunday made the U.S. Open’s return to Merion Golf Club worth all the bother.

It was about history, about putting up with extra shuttle rides and wicker baskets on top of hole pins to enjoy the charm and legacy of this compact course tucked away in a Philadelphia suburb.

About 15 feet short of the famous plaque that commemorates Hogan’s 1-iron approach in 1950, Rose went about finishing off a new chapter in Merion’s place in the sport.

He went with a 4-iron — technology’s come a long way in 63 years — and parred the hole to become the first Englishman in 43 years to win America’s national championship.


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"It’s hard not to play Merion and envision yourself hitting the shot that Hogan did," Rose said. "And even in the moment today, that was not lost on me.

"When I walked over the hill and saw my drive sitting perfectly in the middle of the fairway, with the sun coming out, it was kind of almost fitting. And I just felt like at that point it was a good iron shot on to the green, two putts, like Hogan did, and possibly win this championship."

Rose shot an even-par 70 for a 1-over 281 total for his first major title, two strokes better than Jason Day and Phil Mickelson. Mickelson extended a record that gets more frustrating as the years go by: He’s finished second six times at the U.S. Open without a win.

"Heartbreak," said Mickelson, who had a solo lead after 54 holes for the first time at the Open and was playing on his 43rd birthday.

"This is tough to swallow after coming so close. This was my best chance of all of them. I had a golf course I really liked. I felt this was as good an opportunity as you could ask for. It really hurts."

Hogan won in a playoff after his 1-iron approach, immortalized in one of the sport’s most famous photos, led to par and forced a playoff.

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