Quantcast
Get breaking news alerts via email

Click here to manage your alerts
Tsegaye Kebede of Ethiopia runs in the elite men's race during the London Marathon, Sunday, April 21, 2013. Kebede won the marathon in 2:06:03. (AP Photo/Sang Tan)
Kebede wins London Marathon amid tight security
First Published Apr 22 2013 09:02 am • Last Updated Apr 25 2013 05:17 pm

London • They crossed the line in front of Buckingham Palace with black ribbons on their chests and the Boston Marathon victims on their minds.

Join the Discussion
Post a Comment

Six days after bombs exploded near the Boston finish line, the London Marathon sent out a powerful message of solidarity with the U.S. city and its victims Sunday and put the spotlight back on the sport and away from terrorist fears.

The men’s race began with a poignant 30-second period of silence to remember Boston’s dead and injured and ended with a thrilling finish.

Under clear blue skies, Tsegaye Kebede chased down Emmanuel Mutai in the closing stages and overtook the tiring Kenyan to secure a second London title on The Mall in 2 hours, 6 minutes and 4 seconds, while compatriot Ayele Abshero was third.

"What happened in Boston, it shocked everybody — I didn’t want to believe it," said Kebede, who also won in London in 2010. "Sport is not like that — sport is not political. Sport is free from everything. We have to focus more on sport. This is for them (in Boston).


story continues below
story continues below

"This is education for those who made this accident."

The women’s race was won by Olympic silver medalist Priscah Jeptoo of Kenya in 2:20:15.

About 34,000 runners competed in London, and organizers pledged to donate 2 pounds ($3) for every finisher to "The One Fund Boston" set up to raise money for the bomb victims.

Before the silence at the start of the race, announcer Geoff Wightman urged athletes to "remember our friends and colleagues for whom a day of joy turned into a day of sadness."

Tributes to Boston were visible all around the course, including a banner that said: "Run if you can, walk if you must, but finish for Boston."

"It speaks volumes for London and this race," London Marathon chief executive Nick Bitel said. "It was the perfect response to the horrors we saw in Boston. This shows the solidarity with the British and American people."

Next Page >


Copyright 2014 The Salt Lake Tribune. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Top Reader Comments Read All Comments Post a Comment
Click here to read all comments   Click here to post a comment


About Reader Comments


Reader comments on sltrib.com are the opinions of the writer, not The Salt Lake Tribune. We will delete comments containing obscenities, personal attacks and inappropriate or offensive remarks. Flagrant or repeat violators will be banned. If you see an objectionable comment, please alert us by clicking the arrow on the upper right side of the comment and selecting "Flag comment as inappropriate". If you've recently registered with Disqus or aren't seeing your comments immediately, you may need to verify your email address. To do so, visit disqus.com/account.
See more about comments here.
Staying Connected
Videos
Jobs
Contests and Promotions
  • Search Obituaries
  • Place an Obituary

  • Search Cars
  • Search Homes
  • Search Jobs
  • Search Marketplace
  • Search Legal Notices

  • Other Services
  • Advertise With Us
  • Subscribe to the Newspaper
  • Login to the Electronic Edition
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Contact a newsroom staff member
  • Access the Trib Archives
  • Privacy Policy
  • Missing your paper? Need to place your paper on vacation hold? For this and any other subscription related needs, click here or call 801.204.6100.