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NCAA Tournament: Louisville’s Ware resting after surgery
First Published Apr 01 2013 09:13 am • Last Updated Apr 01 2013 12:37 pm

INDIANAPOLIS • Louisville guard Kevin Ware had successful surgery on his broken right leg Sunday night.

Now his teammates and coaches are waiting to find out when the sophomore will return to campus Tuesday and whether he can travel with them later this week to the Final Four in Atlanta.

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Ware sustained a horrifying fracture in the first half of Sunday’s Midwest Regional final when he landed awkwardly after trying to contest a 3-point shot, breaking his leg in two places. He was taken off the court on a stretcher as his stunned teammates openly wept.

A few hours later, his coach showed up at the hospital with a gift: The regional championship trophy.

"He was groggy, in good spirits. He saw us win the trophy and was crying and said it was all worthwhile," coach Rick Pitino told The Associated Press. "We didn’t cut down the net, but I left him the trophy."

Pitino said he and his son Richard, who recruited Ware, and an equipment manager would spend the night in Indy, along with the team’s doctors.

School officials said doctors reset the bone and inserted a rod into the tibia during the two-hour procedure.

Ware has played a key role in the Cardinals’ second straight Final Four run, scoring 11 points on 5-for-7 shooting in 25 minutes in the regional semifinal win over Oregon, and on Sunday he was the primary motivator. Before leaving the court, he called his teammates over to prod them to win the game and not worry about him, a message he continued to express at halftime. And he was eager to return to Atlanta, where he played high school basketball.

For television viewers, it was a gruesome sight that prompted many to express their sentiments on social media sites. CBS even stopped showing the replay, which was not seen inside Lucas Oil Stadium.

For Louisville players and coaches, it was far worse. Guard Russ Smith said he didn’t see the play but he heard the bone snap. And forward Chane Behanan, Ware’s closest friend, said the sight was almost unimaginable.


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Pitino, one of college basketball’s top winners, thought he had seen just about everything in the sport until Ware’s injury.

"I went over and I was going to help him up and then all of a sudden, I saw what it was and I almost literally threw up," Pitino said.

Ware’s teammates were overcome with emotion, too.

Luke Hancock patted Ware on the chest after Ware rolled himself to the sideline and right in front of the Louisville bench. Behanan and several other players sat on the floor as Ware was treated and some, including Behanan, cried. Duke guard Tyler Thornton covered his eyes when he realized what had happened, and Blue Devils coach Mike Krzyzewski even told Pitino that he would agree to let the teams warm up again if they wanted.

They didn’t, though Pitino did summon Ware’s teammates so he could speak to them. His message was simple: Win the game.

"I said, ‘We’re going to dig in. We’re going to play this game to the end. We’re going to play this game to get him back home,’" Pitino said, explaining his halftime speech. "We’ll get him back home, nurse him to good health and we’re going to get him to Atlanta."

Louisville trainer Fred Hina told Pitino it was the same injury that derailed the Heisman Trophy hopes of running back Michael Bush, who also played at Louisville. Bush recovered from the injury and has had a productive NFL career with Oakland and Chicago.

As it turned out, he was watching.

"I just cried," he wrote on Twitter. "I feel so bad. Flashback of myself. Anyone if he needs anything please let me know."

The reaction was the same everywhere.

Louisville forward Wayne Blackshear fell to the floor, crying, and Behanan looked as if he was going to be sick on the court, kneeling on his hands and feet. Peyton Siva sat a few feet away, a hand covering his mouth.

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