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United States' Ted Ligety speeds down the course during the men's super-G, at the Alpine skiing world championships in Schladming, Austria, Wednesday, Feb.6, 2013. (AP Photo/Alessandro Trovati)
American Ted Ligety wins super-G world title
First Published Feb 06 2013 09:04 am • Last Updated Feb 15 2013 07:40 am

SCHLADMING, Austria • Ted Ligety showed off his improvement in the speed events on the biggest of stages.

Building on his giant slalom skills, the American won his first super-G title Wednesday, surprising even himself with a world championship.

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In front of a crowd of 24,000, Ligety took a lot of risks in the turning final section and mastered the Planai course in 1 minute, 23.96 seconds.

Gauthier De Tessieres of France was 0.20 back in second in another stunning result, and Aksel Lund Svindal of Norway, who won three of the four World Cup super-Gs this season, was another 0.02 back in third.

Defending champion Christof Innerhofer of Italy finished 1.09 off the pace in seventh.

"Today was unbelievable," said Ligety, who was the 10th starter. "It was a nerve-racking 30 minutes, waiting for all the favorites to come down. (To) finally see (Svindal) come down right behind me was a huge weight off my shoulders."

Ligety made a super-G podium only once before, finishing second in a World Cup at Val d’Isere, France, in 2009. This season, he’s finished fourth in two races.

"I am having a good year in super-G but I didn’t think this was possible," he said. "I thought I had a chance for a medal. ... I knew I had to take many risks at the bottom to have a chance. I tried not to slide and to ski as clean as possible."

Ligety became the third American to win the world super-G title in the past 12 years after Daron Rahlves in St. Anton, Austria, in 2001 and Bode Miller in Bormio, Italy, four years later.

The gold is Ligety’s second worlds medal, two years after winning the giant slalom in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany.


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It’s also the second medal for the U.S. team this week, a day after Julia Mancuso placed third in the women’s super-G.

Teammate Lindsey Vonn’s season ended when she tore ligaments in her knee and broke a bone in her leg in a crash Tuesday, but Ligety said that wasn’t on his mind.

"It’s very sad for Lindsey because she was doing great, but it didn’t matter for my race," he said. "You have to move on. I am sure she will be back next year. As a ski racer, you can’t let that affect you too much."

The course set with many turns suited Ligety’s style of skiing. He usually arches long turns better than most of the speed specialists.

"He has been just charging and skiing clean as in GS, with the confidence to take it down the hill at super-G speed." U.S. men’s coach Sasha Rearick said.

"He was able to hang tight with the best gliders on the top and took some time on them on the bottom," Rearick said.

Ligety trailed De Tessieres by 0.41 at the first intermediate time, 30 seconds into his run. He reduced the deficit to 0.06 over the next 30 seconds and beat the Frenchman in the bottom section.

De Tessieres, whose best super-G result on the circuit was eighth, had not qualified for the French team, but replaced Johan Clarey, who pulled out with a back injury Sunday.

"It’s difficult to describe this week," De Tessieres said. "I hadn’t qualified and got a phone call from the coach a couple of days ago and now I am here. I am so happy. It’s amazing, a crazy story."

Several favorites led Ligety at the first split, including Austria’s Matthias Mayer, Italy’s Matteo Marsaglia and Innerhofer, and Svindal.

The course was set by Norway coach Tron Moger, who also placed the gates when Svindal won the super-G in Val Gardena, Italy, in December.

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