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Boston College hockey coach breaks win record
This is an archived article that was published on sltrib.com in 2012, and information in the article may be outdated. It is provided only for personal research purposes and may not be reprinted.

Minneapolis • Boston College coach Jerry York became the NCAA hockey career victory leader Saturday, directing the top-ranked Eagles to a 5-2 win over Alabama-Huntsville in the Mariucci Classic.

The 67-year-old York is 925-558-95 in 41 seasons to move past former Michigan State coach Ron Mason for the record. In 19 seasons at Boston College, York is 458-223-61.

York downplayed the accomplishment.

"I've always been about the team," York said. "When I was a player, I was like that. Since I've been a coach, I've been like that. I've never really sought individual goals."

York began his career as a 26-year-old head coach at Clarkson in 1972, then took over for Mason at Bowling Green before heading to Boston College. He has won four national titles with the Eagles to go with one at Bowling Green.

York's teams have a record 37 wins in the NCAA tournament. They have won the Hockey East tournament nine times and five Beanpot titles — including the last three in a row.

York said his thoughts Saturday were on beating the Chargers.

"Our focus is on our team," he said. "We have a chance to win a trophy. We're focused squarely on our team."

York said he plans to keep coaching as long at Boston College will let him.

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