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Rolly: Misspelled name causes havoc for Utah woman

Published December 27, 2012 9:47 pm

This is an archived article that was published on sltrib.com in 2012, and information in the article may be outdated. It is provided only for personal research purposes and may not be reprinted.

Katherine Wallace was born in New Mexico 80 years ago on New Year's Day, moved to Utah after she got married, settled in Ogden with her husband, Jesse Wallace, who enjoyed a successful medical practice for decades, and has had a Utah driver license for 42 years.

But when she attempted to renew her license recently, she was rejected.

She had all the necessary forms to prove her citizenship and her residency. But she is ineligible under the new laws to get her license.

Why?

Because of a typo.

Her parents named her Katherine, with a "K." She has used Katherine with a "K" on official documents all of her life. Her driver license for the past 42 years identifies her as Katherine with a "K."

But a hospital employee 80 years ago made a mistake and spelled it Catherine, with a "C," on her birth certificate.

Because her birth certificate is not compatible with all the other documents, she was told she could not be approved for a new license in Utah.

She spoke to several people, including supervisors, at the Utah Driver License Division. But, they told her, the law is a law. She could be a socialist plant. Or some kind of a foreign spy.

Her only recourse, she was told, was to get officials in New Mexico to change her name on the birth certificate. So she contacted the Vital Statistics division, sent them numerous official documents, including her high school and college diplomas, showing her name is spelled with a "K." They sent the documents back with a note saying she had not mailed in the necessary fees. So she has to do it all over again and her license expires on Tuesday.

But we're all safer because of the new ID laws, right?

Clueless in Murray • On the evening of Dec. 14, the day 20 first-graders and six educators were murdered by gunfire at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., two young men walked around the track inside the Murray Recreation Center in front of numerous clients doing their nightly workouts carrying toy rifles that resembled real ones. They were carrying the rifles above their heads as they quick-paced around the gym in what appeared to be a military-style exercise.

Those working out on treadmills and exercise bikes were watching reports of the horrible event on television sets placed around the gym. They were not amused.

Christmas cheer • When Lynn Anderson, of Holladay, was enjoying the Mormon Tabernacle Choir on television on a recent Sunday, the camera was panning the choir and orchestra. Two of the trumpet players were using as their mutes what suspiciously looked like the distinctive purple velvet bags that come with Crown Royal Canadian Whisky.

Not the best timing • One reader told me how much he enjoyed listening to KOSY 106.5-FM's format through most of December that contained mostly Christmas music and "a little rock."

The closer it got to Christmas, the more the spirit of Christmas consumed him as he listened to the music he had come to love during the holiday season.

Then, four days before Christmas, at 8 a.m., he says, the station changed its format to round-the-clock classic rock.

He was shocked. It was too soon, he felt, even though he likes classic rock.

The new catchphrase the station used to encourage listeners to set their preset button to 106.5 was "Give us the finger!"

He was more than happy to comply.

prolly@sltrib.com