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Salt Lake City unveils new website for cyclists

Published May 15, 2012 12:45 pm

Biking • Site will offer maps, paved and new trail info and safety tips.
This is an archived article that was published on sltrib.com in 2012, and information in the article may be outdated. It is provided only for personal research purposes and may not be reprinted.

As part of its push to make Salt Lake City a bicycle-friendly community, Mayor Ralph Becker's administration Tuesday unveiled a new website dedicated to cyclists.

The website, http://www.bikeslc.com, contains free downloadable maps, safety tips and information on cycling throughout Salt Lake City, said Becka Roolf, the city's bicycle/pedestrian coordinator.

"Salt Lake City has bicycling opportunities for cyclists of all skill levels, from commuters and recreational riders to hard-core mountain bikers or just families seeking quiet bike paths," she said. "The website will give you what you need to know to get out on two wheels and do it safely and comfortably."

The new site, which comes during Utah Bike Month and the National Bike to Work Week, also contains information on new pilot projects, including a cycling traffic signal at the south end of Liberty Park and the "Cycle Track" along 300 East between 600 and 900 South.

"We [motorists and cyclists] are sharing the roadway and we have to do it safely together," Roolf said.

Salt Lake City is seeing more and more cyclists, said Robin Hutcheson, the city's transportation director. There was a 27 percent increase between September 2010 and September 2011 of people who said they cycle regularly.

"Our job in Salt Lake City is to implement infrastructure and programs to make it safe and easy for bicyclists," Hutcheson said. "We understand that not everyone can ride a bike. But those who can and chose to make it easier for everyone else to get around."

Like Salt Lake City's bike programs, the website will evolve, said Art Raymond, the mayor's spokesman.

"We're looking for new ways to reach out to cyclists," he said. "We encourage growth in biking. It's good for our city on so many levels."