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War on Drugs is insane
This is an archived article that was published on sltrib.com in 2013, and information in the article may be outdated. It is provided only for personal research purposes and may not be reprinted.

Attorney General Eric Holder has made an historic and compassionate decision in a move to revamp the disastrous 50-year "War on Drugs" ("Holder proposes changes in criminal justice system," Tribune, Aug. 13).

It is insane that this country has the highest incarceration rate in the world and far too often low-level, non-violent drug offenders are locked away for years when treatment, education and economic opportunity would cost fractions of the billions spent, ruining lives and families in the process.

Minorities and the poor are paying a disproportionate price for this societal injustice, but every one of us is paying the price to feed and house the dependents.

The only winners in this war are lawyers and the private prison industry who spend millions on legalized bribery of our legislators, demanding that they keep their human ware­houses full.

With the real estate interests and the privileged cohorts who stand to make millions on a new prison, you can virtually bank on the lobbyists coming out of the woodwork to oppose these changes.

Just like the insanity of the gun lobby, is there any doubt that their money will buy the loyalty of unethical, pay to play politicians? Let the "Corruption Games" begin.

Michael Bodell

Midvale

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