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Hatch and disclosure
This is an archived article that was published on sltrib.com in 2012, and information in the article may be outdated. It is provided only for personal research purposes and may not be reprinted.

Since the Supreme Court allowed for limitless spending of money in elections, it has become paramount that the public at least know where the huge influx of money is coming from. This information is vital in order for the public to make informed decisions on the veracity of political ads.

The Disclose Act, S.3369, would require corporations, super PACs, nonprofits and unions to disclose any donations or political expenditures of $10,000 or more within 24 hours. Individuals and companies would be accountable for the ads their money buys.

If a political ad is publicly broadcast, its money source should be as well. It's a basic principle of honesty: If you criticize someone in public, stand by your belief instead of hiding behind a political organization.

Sadly, Sen. Orrin Hatch disagrees. He thinks that limitless amounts of money should be able to be spent in secret. He does not even want the Disclose Act to be voted on. On July 16, Hatch and fellow Republicans filibustered against allowing the Disclose Act to move to the Senate floor for an open and fair vote.

Honesty and transparency should be cornerstones in politics.

M. Bryan Warf

Salt Lake City

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