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Woman traumatized by Columbine massacre turns to drugs, vanishes
Investigation » She was in school when classmates gunned down fellow students.
First Published Feb 16 2014 01:01 am • Last Updated Feb 16 2014 09:21 am

Denver • One rumor had Brandi Jo Malonson dying of a drug overdose the day after Christmas in 2006.

According to another, she was murdered and her killer tossed her body in the Platte River.

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A third variation was that she was killed and her body was dumped in the mountains.

Whatever did happen to the pretty 23-year-old woman, her parents, Richard and Linda Malonson, have not seen or heard from their daughter in seven years.

Malonson grew up in Littleton and attended Columbine High School.

She was a freshman on April 20, 1999. On that day the A-student and talented softball player was in the school’s library when shots rang out and students began screaming.

"At first she thought someone was pulling a prank," her father Richard Malonson said.

But Dylan Klebold and Eric Harris were systematically going through the school, setting off bombs and shooting students. The two friends killed a dozen fellow students and a teacher before committing suicide.

"When she realized that it wasn’t (a prank) she ran," Richard Malonson said. "She made it out of the building. She called her mother."

Linda Malonson picked her daughter and some friends up and took them to their home on 7400 block of South Zephyr Court.


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Brandi Jo knew several of the victims including Isaiah Shoels, 18.

Her sister, Monica, was a senior at Columbine High School at the time.

"Both of my girls were very much affected by the events of that day," Brandi’s mother, Linda Malonson, wrote in a Facebook page called Help Find Brandi Jo. "Many of their friends died that day. This day was the start to what changed our lives forever."

Richard and Linda wanted their daughter to get counseling but she refused.

"She was the kind of girl that took care of others first and not herself," her mother wrote. Still, "she seemed to be doing okay."

The following year on Valentine’s Day, Brandi Jo lost two more close friends.

High-school sweethearts Nicholas Kunselman and Stephanie Hart-Grizzell were shot to death on Feb. 14, 2000, in a Subway sandwich shop a few blocks south of Columbine High School.

Brandi Jo was only a sophomore in high school at the time.

She was a junior at Columbine when a close friend of hers left Brandi a phone message. She was the last person he called before committing suicide on Nov. 10, 2000.

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