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FBI says it has solved a string of ATM thefts with arrest of 2 in Utah
First Published Jan 17 2014 07:58 pm • Last Updated Jan 18 2014 04:28 pm

Boise, Idaho » The FBI believes it has solved a string of at least 20 ATM thefts in seven states with the recent arrest of two men in Utah, one of whom has been indicted for stealing money from an ATM in Idaho and shooting at pursing police officers.

In an application for arrest warrants for Nathan Paul Davenport and Matthew Taber Annable, FBI Special Agent James Patrick lists a string of thefts in which the robbers cut the bolts on the ATM door, attached a chain to a pickup truck and pulled off the door to get to the money, the Idaho Statesman reports.

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Patrick, who is based in Cheyenne, Wyo., was investigating the Dec. 8 theft of just over $74,000 from an ATM in Douglas, Wyo., when he heard about a similar robbery of more than $16,000 from an ATM in Castle Rock, Colo., on Dec. 11.

At that point, Patrick said he contacted FBI offices throughout the United States to determine if similar thefts had occurred elsewhere.

An FBI agent in Montana reported a Nov. 3 theft in Billings and thefts on Nov. 6 and 13 in Missoula that netted a total of just over $41,000. Special Agent Selena DeVantier noted that a series of ATM thefts around the country seemed to have been accomplished in the same manner.

Traces of cellphone use, traffic stops and hotel registrations also indicated that Davenport and Annable were in the area of Cedar Park and San Antonio in Texas during May 2013 robberies; in Niceville, Fla., during July 2013 robberies, and in Pascagoula, Gautier and Gulfport in Mississippi during October 2013 robberies, Patrick’s affidavit said. Those robberies netted a total of nearly $210,000.

Davenport, 34, and Annable, 39, were arrested Jan. 12 in Orem on suspicion of a Dec. 8 robbery in Douglas, Wyo. They appeared in federal court in Salt Lake City on Monday and were ordered to return to Wyoming to face charges.

U.S. Attorney Wendy Olson in Idaho said Davenport was indicted Tuesday with bank larceny by use of a dangerous weapon and use of a deadly weapon for the Jan. 10 robbery and shooting in McCall. Annable has not been charged in Idaho.

Patrick also learned that Davenport was a suspect in two October 2012 ATM thefts in San Antonio, Texas, that cost the banks over $144,000. The San Antonio Express-News reported in November 2012 that Davenport was arrested on a second-degree felony charge for the theft of more than $76,000 from one ATM. It was not immediately clear how that case played out.




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