Quantcast
Get breaking news alerts via email

Click here to manage your alerts
Suicide at Vegas Mormon temple was federal judge’s son

First Published Nov 20 2013 10:07 am • Last Updated Nov 20 2013 04:03 pm

Las Vegas • A 26-year-old man who authorities say killed himself in the courtyard of a Mormon temple in Las Vegas was identified Wednesday as the son of a federal appeals court judge.

Scott Greer Bybee of Henderson died in the shooting just before 6:30 p.m. Tuesday while services were being conducted at the temple, police and the Clark County coroner said.

Join the Discussion
Post a Comment

He was the son of 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Jay Bybee.

No one else was hurt, Las Vegas police Officer Bill Cassell said.

In a statement circulated by a 9th Circuit colleague, Judge Bybee and his wife Dianna Bybee said their son suffered from depression for many years, and they did all they could as parents to help him, including seeking professional advice and treatment.

"While Jay and Dianna mourn for Scott, and grieve for their own loss, they are grateful that he is finally released from his sufferings," said the statement circulated by Judge Milan D. Smith Jr. of El Segundo, Calif. "They have faith that he is in a better place."

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints spokeswoman Kristen Howey issued a statement calling the incident tragic and saying the thoughts and prayers of church members were with those involved.

Jay Bybee, 60, was nominated to the San Francisco-based 9th Circuit court by President George W. Bush and confirmed by the U.S. Senate in 2003.

He has been criticized for authoring documents in August 2002, later dubbed torture memos, that gave interrogators wide latitude to use techniques including waterboarding during questioning of terrorism detainees at the U.S. detention camp at Guantanamo Bay and at Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq.

His statement on the death of his son said no decision had been made concerning a memorial service.


story continues below
story continues below

Mormons believe suicide is wrong, but they don’t hold the person responsible, said Matthew Bowman, an author and assistant professor of religion at Hampden-Sydney College in Virginia.

Families are told that only God can judge the deceased, Bowman said.

—————

Associated Press writers Michelle Rindels in Las Vegas and Brady McCombs in Salt Lake City contributed to this report.



Copyright 2014 The Salt Lake Tribune. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Top Reader Comments Read All Comments Post a Comment
Click here to read all comments   Click here to post a comment


About Reader Comments


Reader comments on sltrib.com are the opinions of the writer, not The Salt Lake Tribune. We will delete comments containing obscenities, personal attacks and inappropriate or offensive remarks. Flagrant or repeat violators will be banned. If you see an objectionable comment, please alert us by clicking the arrow on the upper right side of the comment and selecting "Flag comment as inappropriate". If you've recently registered with Disqus or aren't seeing your comments immediately, you may need to verify your email address. To do so, visit disqus.com/account.
See more about comments here.
Staying Connected
Videos
Jobs
Contests and Promotions
  • Search Obituaries
  • Place an Obituary

  • Search Cars
  • Search Homes
  • Search Jobs
  • Search Marketplace
  • Search Legal Notices

  • Other Services
  • Advertise With Us
  • Subscribe to the Newspaper
  • Access your e-Edition
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Contact a newsroom staff member
  • Access the Trib Archives
  • Privacy Policy
  • Missing your paper? Need to place your paper on vacation hold? For this and any other subscription related needs, click here or call 801.204.6100.