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University of Utah closes library to bake bed bugs
This is an archived article that was published on sltrib.com in 2013, and information in the article may be outdated. It is provided only for personal research purposes and may not be reprinted.

It's taking a little while to put the University of Utah's bug problem to bed.

First spotted last Tuesday on the Marriott Library's third floor, bed bugs were later uncovered in upholstered seating areas on the first and second floors, and the entire library was closed over the weekend to annihilate the bloodsuckers with 140-degree heat treatment.

On Monday, the first floor was reopened to students, says U. spokeswoman Valeree Dowell. She anticipates that the whole library will be open by Tuesday.

Dowell said she's heard from a few students who were concerned about the reports, including one who had a favorite chair on the second floor and wanted assurances that it would be back.

"They're very relieved and grateful for what's being done," Dowell said.

Bed bugs are not a threat to students' health, and their presence is not an indication of poor hygiene or cleanliness. Bed bug bites, like mosquito bites, create itchy red bumps, and they often are found in clusters.

Staff at the U. Student Health Center are prepared to help any patients who require treatment for bed bug bites, says U. of U. Health Care spokeswoman Melinda Rogers.

mpiper@sltrib.com

Twitter: @matthew_piper

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