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More snow possible for parts of Utah Monday
Weather » Weekend storm led to multiple crashes around valley.
First Published Dec 09 2012 10:05 am • Last Updated Apr 08 2013 11:31 pm

A second wintry storm system was expected to move into Utah Monday, bringing with it some additional snow accumulation.

The storm system was expected to bring up to an inch of new snow to the Salt Lake Valley on Monday and likely snarl the morning commute for drivers in communities north of Salt Lake City, according to the National Weather Service (NWS) office in Salt Lake City.

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Officially as Saturday’s storm moved out of the state, 3.5 inches of snow had fallen at Salt Lake City International Airport.

On Sunday, the Utah Highway Patrol reported troopers had worked 96 crashes in Salt Lake County and 18 in Utah County. Most of the crashes were caused by drivers traveling too fast on roads that were wet, slushy or icy, UHP Cpl. Todd Johnson said.

Motorists tend to forget they need to slow down when the weather turns, Johnson said, "but that’s when bad things happen."

One Salt Lake County crash involved a UHP patrol car that was already working a crash along Interstate 15. Officials said a passing motorist lost control and clipped the patrol car and then narrowly missed the trooper who was outside the vehicle investigating the other crash.

Snow totals from the NWS show that Wasatch mountain ski resorts benefited most from the weekend storm. Brighton saw 16 inches of fresh snow and Alta, 13 inches. The Canyons recorded 10 inches of snow, Solitude, 7 inches and Snowbasin had 5 inches.

For back-country ski enthusiasts, the fresh snowfall also brought moderate avalanche advisories for the Logan, Salt Lake, Uinta and Manti-Skyline mountains. A low risk of avalanches existed for the Ogden, Provo and Moab ranges. Posts by avalanche forecasters on the Utah Avalanche Center website indicate the danger of human-caused slides is primarily above 8,000 feet. The risk of natural avalanches appears low, forecasters said.

For the Salt Lake Valley, the weekend storm brought nearly 6 inches of snow to Taylorsville, and both Magna and West Jordan saw 5 inches. Elsewhere, 6 inches of snow fell in Tooele, 5 inches in Spanish Fork and 3.5 inches was recorded in Centerville.

NWS meterologists on Sunday were projecting a mid-week break in the weather, but said another storm is forecast for the end of the week.


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Reporter Jennifer Dobner contributed to this story.

jstecklein@sltrib.com

Twitter @sltribjanelle



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