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(Chris Detrick | The Salt Lake Tribune) Chupacabra Raptors made by local artist Fred Conlon of Sugarpost Metalworks for sale at the Natural History Museum of Utah Wednesday, Dec. 5, 2012. The dinosaur sculptures are made out of found metal, including bicycle chains, wrenches, with racoon skulls.
Our favorite things: Local treasures from Utah artists

Gift Guide » We’ve searched through local boutiques and stores to find an eclectic selection of local gifts.

TRIBUNE FEATURES STAFF

First Published Dec 06 2012 02:43 pm • Last Updated Apr 08 2013 11:32 pm

It’s Christmastime in the city, and when shoppers rush home with their treasures, they don’t have to rush home from the national chain big-box stores. You can buy from local merchants and give your loved ones presents they aren’t expecting.

Here are a few of our favorite things — not raindrops on roses or whiskers on kittens, but iron skillets, concert posters, "A Christmas Story" souvenir lamp, and dinosaur sculptures made out of found metal.

At a glance

Seeking local art and artisans?

Here’s a few of our favorite shows.

Holiday jewelry trunk shows » (Dec. 7 and 8) Natural History Museum of Utah showcases the copper jewelry of Fred Wilhelmsen, gems and mineral jewelry of Kim Kendell, and Jessica Bolda’s bead work at the show, which runs from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. (Proceeds benefit the museum.) Also save 10 percent on Wednesdays in December from 5-9 p.m. at the gift shop. 331 Wakara Way, Salt Lake City; 801-581-6927.

Art Barn’s holiday craft exhibit and sale » (Through Dec. 19). Salt Lake City Arts Council holds its 29th annual sale at the Art Barn in Reservoir Park, 1340 E. 100 South, Salt Lake City. Work for sale includes letterpress cards, holiday ornaments, scarves, hats, cups, bowls, jewelry and art glass. Gallery hours are Monday-Friday, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Saturday-Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; and until 9 p.m. on Gallery Stroll on Friday, Dec. 7. Info at 801-596-5000 or www.slcgov.com/arts.

Holiday market at Gallivan Center » (Fridays and Saturdays through Dec. 22) Focusing on local, hand-made goods and one-of-a-kind items. Free admission; 11 a.m.-8 p.m.; 239 S. Main St., Salt Lake City.

Vine St. holiday market » (Saturdays through Dec. 22) More than 25 vendors will offer locally made items, art, jewelry, vintage wares and artisanal food at this market in a 1906-era church, 184 E. Vine St. (5144 South), Murray; 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturdays, and Sunday, Dec. 16. Artists seeking information should contact vsholidaymarket@gmail.com. Info at www.vinestmarket.com.

Dickens Festival » (Dec. 7-8 and 10-15)Olde World charm, offering everything from hand-made rocking horses to hand-carved rubber-band guns to an appearance by Santa Claus. At the Utah State Fairpark, 155 N. 1000 West, Salt Lake City; weekdays 4-9 p.m. and weekends 10 a.m.-9 p.m.; admission $7 adults, $5 seniors (65+) and children (4-12); dickenschristmasfestival.com.

More favorite things

I If you know of local products that you think would make perfect holiday gifts, send an email explaining why (with a link to the item) to spierce@sltrib.com, who will consider for a blog post or future story.

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Camp Chef cast-iron skillets

Why I love it » Cast iron is the cookware of choice these days, but you don’t have to pay for enameled colors or fancy French names. An old-school black cast-iron skillet — which comes already seasoned — cooks just as well at a quarter of the price. I use mine at least once a day, maybe more, to grill sandwiches, sear meats or bake breads and desserts. Yes, it’s heavy; a 14-inch skillet weighs about 10 pounds. Just store it in the oven and enjoy working your muscles every time you heave it onto the stove.

Where » Sporting-goods and farm stores throughout the state. Find a dealer at campchef.com

Cost » Vary by location, but a 14-inch skillet costs around $33.

Whom to give to » Expert and wannabe chefs.

Travis Bone’s concert posters

What makes it unique » The 30-year-old Utah Valley University graduate (who earned a degree in nanoscale chemistry) combines his love for music with his love for visual arts and has become one of the area’s most prolific concert poster designers. His promotional posters have been commissioned by promoters at Red Butte Garden and the Twilight concert series, and left-over posters are available for purchase. Bone’s designs are whimsical with a nostalgic edge, and they serve to commemorate concerts gone by.


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Where to buy » The Hive Gallery at Layton Hills Mall, or at furturtle.com

Price » Varies, but can run from as little as $10 or as much as $40 or more

Whom to give to » You know those friends who save every ticket stub from every concert they’ve ever been to? Well, concert posters are much easier to frame.

Leg lamp, inspired by the movie "A Christmas Story"

What makes it unique » This isn’t a cheap novelty item — it’s a real lamp created by real lamp-makers. It’s not only cool, it’s fra-GEE-lay.

Where » The Lamp Company, 1443 S. 700 East, Salt Lake City; 801-487-9636; thelampco.com

Price » $179 (special order)

Whom to give to » Fans of the movie. Including me.

Chupacabra Raptor sculpture

What makes it unique » On his website, artist Fred Conlon’s work is touted as "original metal art that doesn’t suck." His found-metal raptor sculptures at the Natural History Museum’s gift shop appear gracefully inventive, the kind of art that serves as a reminder of Utah’s recent past (thanks to feet made out of wrenches) as well as our region’s ancient history (thanks to a raccoon skull representing the raptor’s head).

Where » Natural History Museum of Utah, 301 Wakara Way, Salt Lake City; 801-581-6927; or www.sugarpost.com

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