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Parade crowd to determine fate of mayoral mustache

Published July 2, 2012 9:11 pm

Save or shave? • Onlookers will "vote" on famed facial hair.
This is an archived article that was published on sltrib.com in 2012, and information in the article may be outdated. It is provided only for personal research purposes and may not be reprinted.

This July 4, Murray Mayor Dan Snarr could be asked to proclaim independence from part or all of his 18-inch handlebar mustache, a work of art he's cultivated across his face for close to three years.

While the audacious facial hair may be the longest of its kind in Utah and perhaps the nation, April Snarr says "shave it," at times telling her mate of more than 39 years "I'd like to kiss you, but I can't find a way in."

However, Murray resident Noah Hardman — a young fan who masqueraded as Snarr for Halloween — is on the stump to "save it."

During Wednesday's parade, onlookers can vote with their thumbs — up means save, down means shave. A video camera on the side of Snarr's car will record the crowd's "ballots," determining how much longer the four-term mayor will remain so outwardly ostentatious.

April Snarr said her husband's overgrown crumb-catcher has crossed over from fashion "into the freak stage" and is now akin to women who grow fingernails so long that they curve around their limbs several times.

"He's always been kind of strange, and he likes to do weird things," April Snarr said. "I tell people to pray for me."

Hardman will display a "Save the Stache" sign as he rides between the Snarrs in their parade vehicle, while April Snarr will hold a giant pair of scissors similar to those reserved for ceremonial ribbon-cuttings.

In mid-2009, Snarr trimmed back his notorious whiskers for charity. However the curved lip ornament grew back with a vengeance and after three months of trial and error and about $100 worth of "product," Snarr figured out how to sustain the horizontal handlebars using high-priced hair spray and spiking gel.

"Kids and cowboys love it, but parents say I've brought shame to the Murray name," Snarr said, unabashed about his stache attachment. "I told Noah to start crying if there are too many thumbs down."

His wife already questions the validity of Wednesday's video vote.

"It will not be very scientific," April Snarr said.

Similar to Congress, the couple remains polarized on the issue they've labeled "Decision 2012."

"One night she said it's either me or the stache," Snarr said. "I said, 'C'mon, April, it's been nice knowing you.' "

Perhaps some sort of middle ground can still be found.

"If [the crowd] says to shave, the question is how much," Dan Snarr said.

"Even if he does keep it, he's got to trim it way back," said his better half with the big scissors.

cmckitrick@sltrib.comtwitter: @catmck —

Murray's July 4th parade

The procession starts at 8:30 a.m. at 6100 S. State St., heading north to Vine Street, the east on Vine to 330 E. Vine St., where it enters Murray Park through the north entrance and concludes at the park's west end.