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Boy released from hospital after crash in W. Jordan that killed brother

Published December 27, 2011 3:55 pm

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This is an archived article that was published on sltrib.com in 2011, and information in the article may be outdated. It is provided only for personal research purposes and may not be reprinted.

A 3-year-old boy who was hurt in a Christmas Eve crash in West Jordan that killed his 18-month-old brother and injured their parents has been released from the hospital.

Finn Pack was released from Primary Children's Medical Center on Dec. 26, which is also his mother Kelly's birthday, according to a hospital spokeswoman and an update on kellypack.com, a website maintained by his family.

Kelly Pack remained in serious condition Tuesday morning at University Hospital, said hospital spokesman Phil Sahm. Her husband Ryan Pack improved to fair condition. The family reports rehabilitation from their injuries will take more than six months for Ryan Pack and a year for his wife.

A candlelight vigil supporting the family was scheduled for 6 to 9 p.m. Wednesday at the Pack home, 178 N. 400 East in American Fork, according to the family website. Anyone wishing to make a donation to help the family with medical bills can do so by visiting the website.

Police are still investigating the crash, which happened about 6 p.m. Saturday as the family drove home. At 9000 South near 1000 West, a Chevy Suburban hopped a raised, landscaped median and slammed head-on into the Packs' oncoming Subaru. The Suburban driver, described as a man in his 40s, was seriously hurt.

The mother, father and 18-month-old Colum Pack were flown by helicopter to University Hospital in critical condition. Colum died of his injuries Christmas Day.

West Jordan police Officer J.C. Holt told The Tribune on Monday: "Our hearts just go out to the family. It's a tragic thing to happen any time, but especially at Christmas."

Police said there were no obvious signs of drug or alcohol impairment on the part of the Suburban driver. Toxicology tests are expected to take three to eight weeks to complete.

lwhitehurst@sltrib.com