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State disciplines electricians for unprofessional conduct, drug use

Published January 3, 2013 1:01 am

This is an archived article that was published on sltrib.com in 2013, and information in the article may be outdated. It is provided only for personal research purposes and may not be reprinted.

Between December 2011 and November 2012, 29 electricians in Salt Lake and Davis counties were disciplined by the state.

Twenty-three of the master, journeyman and apprentice electricians disciplined were in Salt Lake County. Of those, eight electricians in Salt Lake City were disciplined, followed by four in West Jordan and three in Sandy.

Out of the six in Davis County, half were in Layton, with Bountiful, Clinton and West Point each having one.

The numbers represent individuals, and not the number of offenses they were found to have committed.

The offenses ranged from engaging in unprofessional conduct prior to submitting an application for a license to substance abuse and failure "to demonstrate good moral character."

One apprentice electrician was cited for acting beyond the scope of his license.

The most severe punishment was license revocation. Others were placed on probation for various lengths of time. In one case , an apprentice electrician's license was placed on probation as long as his name appears on the state's sex offender registry.

The information is part of the professional license database on UtahsRight.com, which can be found at http://extras.sltrib.com/DOPL_search">http://extras.sltrib.com/DOPL_search.

The data were compiled by UtahsRight.com for a weekly series in The Salt Lake Tribune's Close-Up section highlighting information gleaned from public databases. The purpose is not to provide analysis of the data, but to provide raw numbers so the public can analyze the data themselves for their own purposes.

UtahsRight.com, the data website for The Salt Lake Tribune, conducts an ongoing statewide quest for district court information and other public information, including salaries of public employees and restaurant inspections, using public records requests made under the state's Government Records Access and Management Act, commonly known as GRAMA.

dmeyers@sltrib.com

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