Quantcast
Get breaking news alerts via email

Click here to manage your alerts
Actor Andrew Garfield, center, and director Ramin Bahrani, right, arrive for a photo call for the movie 99 Homes at the 71st edition of the Venice Film Festival in Venice, Italy, Friday, Aug. 29, 2014. (AP Photo/David Azia)
U.S. subprime crisis stars in Venice film festival

Depiction » The movie “99 Homes” portrays realtors dimly during mortgage meltdown.

First Published Aug 29 2014 04:42 pm • Last Updated Aug 29 2014 04:42 pm

Venice, Italy • Florida’s realtors and tourism authorities probably will not be using "99 Homes" in their promotional material.

The Sunshine State looks pretty shady in Ramin Bahrani’s Orlando-set drama, one of 20 films competing for prizes at the Venice Film Festival.

Join the Discussion
Post a Comment

The movie stars Andrew Garfield as an evicted construction worker who sells his soul to the devil — or at least to Michael Shannon’s reptilian real estate agent — and takes a job evicting other struggling souls to earn enough money to get his family home back.

A portrait of a financial system stacked in favor of the winners, it’s "Wall Street" for the subprime mortgage era, and the director says he wanted to show a different side to a state famous for "golf carts and retirees, Magic Kingdoms and castles."

Bahrani, the director of grittily naturalistic indie movies including "Chop Shop" and "Goodbye Solo," researched the film by visiting real estate agencies, hedge-fund managers, fraud attorneys and foreclosure courts in the state.

"After two or three weeks in Florida, I was dizzied by the corruption," the American director told reporters in Venice on Friday.

Garfield and Shannon also dived into first-hand research. Shannon spent time with a real estate agent, while Garfield, like his character, stayed in a motel occupied by families whose homes had been repossessed.

The actor said he found the evictees remarkably willing to talk.

"It felt like they needed to share it constantly throughout the day to make sense of it," Garfield said. "Because it felt completely irrational and of course unjust, the situation they were in."




Copyright 2014 The Salt Lake Tribune. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Top Reader Comments Read All Comments Post a Comment
Click here to read all comments   Click here to post a comment


About Reader Comments


Reader comments on sltrib.com are the opinions of the writer, not The Salt Lake Tribune. We will delete comments containing obscenities, personal attacks and inappropriate or offensive remarks. Flagrant or repeat violators will be banned. If you see an objectionable comment, please alert us by clicking the arrow on the upper right side of the comment and selecting "Flag comment as inappropriate". If you've recently registered with Disqus or aren't seeing your comments immediately, you may need to verify your email address. To do so, visit disqus.com/account.
See more about comments here.
Staying Connected
Videos
Jobs
Contests and Promotions
  • Search Obituaries
  • Place an Obituary

  • Search Cars
  • Search Homes
  • Search Jobs
  • Search Marketplace
  • Search Legal Notices

  • Other Services
  • Advertise With Us
  • Subscribe to the Newspaper
  • Access your e-Edition
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Contact a newsroom staff member
  • Access the Trib Archives
  • Privacy Policy
  • Missing your paper? Need to place your paper on vacation hold? For this and any other subscription related needs, click here or call 801.204.6100.