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FILE - In this June 5, 2014 file photo, President of European Central Bank Mario Draghi speaks during a news conference in Frankfurt, Germany. The 18-country eurozone bloc, a key region that emerged from a brutal recession last year, didn’t grow at all in the second quarter, it was reported Thursday, Aug. 14, 2014. (AP Photo/Michael Probst, File)
Why global turmoil hasn’t sunk US markets. Yet.
First Published Aug 16 2014 11:04 am • Last Updated Aug 16 2014 11:04 am

New York • Europe appears on the brink of another recession. Islamic militants have seized Iraqi territory. Russian troops have massed on the Ukraine border, and the resulting sanctions are disrupting trade. An Ebola outbreak in Africa and Israel’s war in Gaza are contributing to the gloom.

It’s been a grim summer in much of the world. Yet investors in the United States have largely shrugged it off — so far at least.

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A big reason is that five years after the Great Recession officially ended, the U.S. economy is showing a strength and durability that other major nations can only envy. Thanks in part to the Federal Reserve’s ultra-low interest rates, employers have ramped up hiring, factories have boosted production and businesses have been making money.

All of this has cushioned the U.S. economy from the economic damage abroad. And investors have responded by keeping U.S. stocks near all-time highs. Not even reports Friday of a Ukrainian attack on Russian military vehicles unnerved investors for long, with blue chip stocks regaining nearly all their midday losses by the close.

"We’re in a much better place psychologically," says Mark Zandi, chief economist at Moody’s Analytics. "And it’s allowing us to weather the geopolitical threats much more gracefully."

Still, the global turmoil comes at a delicate time.

China, the world’s second-biggest economy, is struggling to contain the fallout from a runaway lending and investment boom that’s powered its growth since before the 2008 financial crisis. The economies of Japan and Germany, the world’s third- and fourth-largest, shrank in the spring. So did Italy’s.

It might not take much — an oil-price spike, a prolonged recession in Europe, a plunge in business or consumer confidence — to derail the global economy.

Here’s a look at the strengths and weaknesses of the U.S economy and others, and why the calm in markets may or may not last:

STRENGTHS:


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— MORE JOBS

Hiring in the United States has surged in the first seven months of this year.

Monthly job gains are averaging a solid and steady 230,000, based on government figures. That’s roughly an average of 35,000 more jobs each month compared with last year.

Fewer people are applying for unemployment benefits. And fewer new hires are working as temps. Both trends suggest stronger job security.

Economists say the cumulative effect of all those additional paychecks should propel growth and help insulate the U.S. economy from trouble abroad.

Though low-paying industries account for much of the hiring, many economists foresee more jobs coming from higher-wage industries such as construction, engineering and consulting.

Zandi expects monthly job growth to accelerate to an average of 275,000 sometime next year.

— RECORD PROFITS

Earnings at companies in the Standard and Poor’s 500 index are on track to jump 10 percent in the second quarter from a year earlier, according to S&P Capital IQ, a research firm. That would be the biggest quarterly gain in nearly three years.

That news has helped the S&P 500 index climb nearly 6 percent this year, extending a bull market into its sixth year. The gains have been remarkably steady, too. The stock market hasn’t suffered a "correction" — a drop of 10 percent — in nearly three years, twice as long as is typical.

Still, some markets outside the U.S. are falling.

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