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FILE - This Monday, May 19, 2014, file photo, shows a home for sale in the Coconut Grove neighborhood of Miami. U.S. home prices rose in April compared with a year earlier, but the increase was the smallest annual gain in 14 months. Price gains have slowed this year as sales have faltered. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky, File)
Tepid sales slow price gains in U.S. housing market
Economics » April’s year-over-year gain was the smallest in 14 months.
First Published Jun 03 2014 12:45 pm • Last Updated Jun 03 2014 03:31 pm

Washington • U.S. home prices rose in April compared with a year earlier, but the increase was the smallest annual gain in 14 months. Price gains have slowed this year as sales have faltered.

Data provider CoreLogic said Tuesday that prices rose 10.5 percent in April from 12 months earlier. That is a healthy gain, but it is down from March’s 11.1 percent increase and February’s 12.2 percent rise.

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On a month-to-month basis, April prices rose 2.1 percent. But CoreLogic’s monthly figures aren’t adjusted for seasonal patterns, such as warmer spring weather.

Higher mortgage rates, tight credit and a limited supply of available homes have slowed the housing recovery. Sales of existing homes ticked up in April after falling to a 20-month low in March. They were still 6.8 percent lower than a year ago.

Prices rose in the 12 months ending in April in every state, CoreLogic said. The states with the biggest price gains were California, 15.6 percent; Nevada, 14.8 percent; Hawaii, 14.1 percent; Oregon, 11.8 percent; and Michigan, 11.3 percent.

Ninety-five of the 100 largest metro areas reported higher prices in April compared with a year earlier. The five that did not record an increase were: Hartford, Connecticut; Milwaukee, Wisconsin; Little Rock, Arkansas; Worcester, Massachusetts; and New Haven, Connecticut.

Nationwide, home prices are still 14.3 percent below the peak they reached in April 2006, when the housing bubble began to deflate. But in 23 states, prices are at or within 10 percent of their previous peaks, according to CoreLogic’s figures.

Housing began to recover in 2012, but sales of existing homes stalled after mortgage rates jumped last spring. Most economists forecast that sales will barely rise this year from 2013’s pace of 5.1 million. Sluggish sales, in turn, will slow annual price gains this year to roughly 5 percent or 6 percent, economists predict.




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