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FILE - In this Wednesday, Feb. 20, 2013, file photo, Google co-founder Sergey Brin wears Google Glass in San Francisco. Google is once again selling its Internet-connected eyewear to anyone in the U.S. as the company fine tunes a device that has sparked intrigue and disdain for its potential to change the way people interact with technology. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, File)
Google Glass resumes sales in the U.S.
Tech » Device still in testing mode, but it can be yours for an eye-popping $1,500.
First Published May 14 2014 10:30 am • Last Updated May 14 2014 04:00 pm

San Francisco • Google is once again selling its Internet-connected eyewear to anyone in the U.S. as the company fine-tunes a device that has sparked intrigue and disdain for its potential to change the way people interact with technology.

The latest release of Google Glass comes a month after a one-day sale gave U.S. residents their first chance to buy the hottest accessory in geek fashion.

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Google Inc. isn’t setting a time limit for people to buy Glass this time, although the company is emphasizing that the product remains in its test, or "Explorer," phase.

As has been the case since Google began selling Glass to a select group in 2012, the device costs $1,500. It’s only available on Google’s website for now.

Glass, which comes in five different colors, looks like a pair of spectacles except the Explorer edition doesn’t contain any actual glass in the frame. Instead, the device has a thumbnail-sized screen attached above the right eye so a user can check email, see Twitter posts or get directions without having to grope for a phone.

Google is offering an option to add a titanium frame that can be fitted with prescription lenses or sunglasses from Maui Jim or Zeal Optics that can be clipped on. Google isn’t charging extra for the titanium frame or sunglasses.

The resumed sale of Google Glass is the latest indication that the Mountain View, Calif., company is nearing a mass-market release of the device.

Google is planning to release a more polished version of Glass by the end of this year that may sell for less than the price of the Explorer version. Analysts believe the cost will have to come down dramatically if Glass is to become anything more than a novelty worn by gadget lovers and wealthy consumers trying to impress their friends.

The parts and assembly of Glass cost only $152.47, based on an analysis by the research firm IHS Technology. Most of Glass’ costs stem from the extensive engineering and design that it took to invent the device, IHS said.




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