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Cranes salvage the last car from from a train derailment in the Bronx section of New York, Monday, Dec. 2, 2013. Federal authorities began righting the cars Monday morning as they started an exhaustive investigation into what caused a Metro-North commuter train rounding a riverside curve to derail, killing four people and injuring more than 60 others. A second "event recorder" retrieved from the train may provide information on the speed of the train, how the brakes were applied, and the throttle setting, a member of the National Transportation Safety Board said Monday. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
Union exec: NYC train engineer caught himself nodding
First Published Dec 03 2013 08:29 am • Last Updated Dec 03 2013 04:01 pm

Yonkers, N.Y. • A rail union official says a commuter train engineer caught himself nodding at the controls before the train started to veer off its tracks and derailed in New York City, killing four people and injuring dozens.

Union leader Anthony Bottalico (boh-TAL’-ih-koh) said Tuesday that William Rockefeller "caught himself, but he caught himself too late."

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Bottalico says Rockefeller told him he "nodded," akin to a momentary lapse while driving a car.

The National Transportation Safety Board is interviewing Rockefeller. Member Earl Weener says it’s too soon to say whether the engineer was fully conscious around the time of Sunday’s wreck in the Bronx. He says it’s too soon to say whether the wreck was the result of human error or a mechanical problem.

A lawyer for Rockefeller hasn’t returned calls. A former boss calls Rockefeller a stellar employee.

While investigators have yet to finish talking with him, a darkening cloud of questions is forming around Rockefeller because the Metro-North Railroad train went into the curve at 82 mph, or nearly three times the speed limit.

As National Transportation Safety Board continued working Tuesday to determine what caused the Sunday morning wreck in the Bronx, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Rockefeller should be disciplined for "unjustifiable" speed.

Rockefeller has stayed out of sight.

"This is a man who is totally distraught by the loss of life, and he’s having a tough time dealing with that," Bottalico said.

Weener said Monday that information from the data recorders indicates the throttle was let up and the brakes were fully applied just five or six seconds before the train came to a grinding, smoking halt.


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Investigators said it was soon to say whether the excessive speed was the result of human error or a mechanical problem.

But Weener said investigators hadn’t found any evidence of brake trouble during the train’s nine previous stops.

Investigators began talking to the engineer Monday but didn’t complete the interview. It is unlikely to resume until Wednesday, NTSB spokesman Keith Holloway said Tuesday.

He said he had no information on why; Bottalico said the session wasn’t finished because Rockefeller was distressed and hadn’t slept in almost 24 hours.

Rockefeller was given drug and alcohol tests — the results weren’t available Monday, Weener said — and investigators were examining the engineer’s cellphone. Engineers can have cellphones but are not allowed to use them during a train’s run.

The New York Police Department is conducting its own investigation, with help from the Bronx district attorney’s office, in the event the derailment becomes a criminal case.

Whatever the findings on the cause of the crash, Cuomo said Tuesday the engineer could be faulted for the train’s speed alone.

"Certainly, we want to make sure that that operator is disciplined in an appropriate way. There’s such a gross deviation from the norm," he said.

An attorney for Rockefeller didn’t immediately return calls Tuesday, but his union spoke up in his defense.

"Once the NTSB is done with their investigation and Billy is finished with his interview, it will be quite evident that there was no criminal intent with the operation of his train," Bottalico said.

Rockefeller, 46 and married with no children, has worked for the railroad for about 20 years and has been an engineer for 11, Bottalico said. Rockefeller lives in a well-kept house on a modest rural road in Germantown, N.Y., about 40 miles south of Albany.

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