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In this Friday, Aug. 2, 2013 photo Sara Musillo, left, assistant store manager at David's Bridal in New York assists Yolanda Royal, 64, center as she tries on wedding dresses with her niece Angelic Lavine. Royal and her husband-to-be plan to spend about $11,000 on their wedding reception for about 100 peopl. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
Older brides bucking tradition with fancy gowns, garter belts, DJs

Wedding business » More couples are marrying in their golden years, and those older couples spend more.

By ANNE D’INNOCENZIO

The Associated Press

First Published Aug 29 2013 01:01 am • Last Updated Aug 29 2013 06:17 pm

SherryLynne Heller-Wells always wanted a fairy-tale wedding.

So when she tied the knot last year, she spared no detail. She walked down the aisle in a flowing ivory gown with a long veil and lacy bolero jacket. Ten flower-toting bridesmaids and seven groomsmen were in the wedding party. After the ceremony, 100 guests dined on beef tenderloin, clams casino and a three-tier vanilla cake.

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The cost, including a fireworks show during the reception, was $45,000.

Heller-Wells wasn’t some blushing new bride. When the retired registered nurse, 64, wed her husband, Clyde, a small-business owner who is 65, it was her second time at the altar.

"I met my Prince Charming. He swept me off my feet," says the Clearwater, Fla., widow, whose first husband died in 2003. "We’re hoping this will be the last marriage. Why not celebrate?"

Only a few years ago, it was considered in poor taste for a bride over 55, particularly if she had been previously married, to do things like wear a fancy wedding gown, rock out to a DJ at the reception or have the groom slip a lacy garter belt off her leg. Those days are gone: Older couples no longer are tying the knot in subtle ways.

The trend in part is being driven by a desire to emulate the lavish weddings of celebrities of all ages. But it’s also one of the results of a new "everything goes" approach that does away with long-held traditions and cookie-cutter ceremonies in favor of doing things like replacing the first husband-and-wife dance with a group re-enactment of Michael Jackson’s "Thriller" video. That’s left older couples feeling less self-conscious about shelling out serious cash to party like their younger peers.

"The rules are out the window … whether it’s what you’re wearing or the cake you’re serving," says Darcy Miller, editorial director of Martha Stewart Weddings, a wedding magazine. "Sixty is the new 40, and that is reflected in the wedding."

Couples 55 and older made up just 8 percent of last year’s $53 billion wedding business. But that number has doubled since 2002, according to Shane McMurray, CEO of The Wedding Report, which tracks spending trends in the wedding industry.

It’s in part because more couples are marrying in their golden years.


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In 2011, women 55 and older accounted for 5.2 percent and men in that age range made up 7.9 percent of the more than 2.1 million marriages performed in that year in the U.S., according to Bowling Green State University’s National Center for Family and Marriage Research, based on analysis of census figures. That’s up from 2001, when 2.6 percent of new marriages performed were among women in that age group; for men, it was 6.6 percent.

And those older couples spend more. That’s because they’re usually empty nesters who don’t have the same worries as their younger counterparts: They aren’t saving for their first home, for instance, and they aren’t burdened by huge student loan debts they must worry about paying off.

As a result, older couples dish out about 10 percent to 15 percent more than the cost of the average wedding, which was $25,656 last year, down from the pre-recession peak in 2007 of $28,732, according to The Wedding Report.

That’s meant big business for companies that cater to brides- and grooms-to-be. Zaven Ghanimian, CEO of Simon G. Jewelry, which sells engagement rings and other jewelry to about 900 small stores across the country, says men in their late 50s and older have been investing more on engagement rings. A few years ago, they were spending $1,500 to $2,000; now, they’re shelling out $4,000 to $8,000.

And at David’s Bridal, the nation’s largest bridal chain with 300 locations across the U.S., business from older couples has doubled in the past two years, compared with modest growth for the younger age group, says Brian Beitler, the chain’s chief marketing officer. While older customers represent only 2 percent to 3 percent of overall sales, the company expects that figure to keep growing.

And they’re a lucrative bunch. David’s Bridal, based in Consohocken, Pa., says older brides spend about $700 to $800 on gowns, including accessories like necklaces. That’s higher than the $500 to $600 that customers in their 20s and early 30s typically spend.

Older brides aren’t just spending more, they’re spending differently. For instance, in the past, older brides tended to stick with special-occasion dresses, but now they want more traditional wedding gowns.

"She’s our dream bride," says Catalina Maddox, fashion director at David’s Bridal. "She wants everything that the 25-year-old bride wants, but more."

The trend is so prevalent that David’s Bridal is looking at ways to better connect with the older wedding crowd. In fact, its store in Danbury, Conn., recently held a bridal fashion show at a nearby nursing and rehabilitation facility; the event was a hit with the residents, the store says.

"It really sparked something," said Jenna McNamara, the assistant store manager at David’s Bridal in Danbury, Conn., which has noticed residents in nearby retirement homes as customers for either weddings or commitment ceremonies. "We realized this was something huge."

Terry Hall, fashion director at Kleinfeld’s, the New York City bridal salon that has the nation’s biggest selection of designer bridal wear under one roof with more than 1,000 designs, also has seen a change in attitude in the past year or so among the older set. He said business from that group has doubled.

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