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(AP Photo/Reed Saxon) Even in a market glutted with job seekers, more than a third of employers in a June CareerBuilder survey said they have positions they can’t fill because of a lack of qualified candidates.
By hiring online, companies often miss best applicants
Labor » Overly rigid screening contributes to shortage of skilled workers, experts say.
First Published Sep 22 2012 04:13 pm • Last Updated Jan 07 2013 11:31 pm

The emailed rejection came as no surprise to Bill Skibinski, although the Abingdon, Md., resident believed he was more than qualified for the entry-level job he’d applied for online.

After spending two years seeking full-time work, Skibinski is convinced that the computerized screening systems most companies use to hire actually work against job candidates, no matter how qualified they are.

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"It is a frustrating and unfair process," said Skibinski, who is working part time as a contractor while completing a master’s degree in environmental planning at Towson University. "You don’t hear a thing through the Web process, but that’s really the only way you can" apply for a job.

Most large employers, even the federal government, use so-called applicant tracking systems to find qualified candidates. Increasingly, smaller companies are turning to them, too. Software screening is designed to help employers manage overwhelming volumes of applications and eliminate applicants who lack the required skills.

But some experts blame these systems for actually eliminating qualified candidates and for contributing to a shortage of skilled workers — a problem companies say they face even in a market glutted with job seekers.

More than a third of employers in a June CareerBuilder survey said they have positions they can’t fill because of a lack of qualified candidates. And that’s hurting business. A third said vacancies lead to overworked employees and a lower quality of work.

Peter Cappelli, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School of business, argues in his book "Why Good People Can’t Get Jobs" that employers can’t find qualified workers not because of a "skills gap," but because employers’ hiring requirements are unrealistic, salaries are too low and overly rigid applicant screening keeps most people out.

"The problem comes with employers trying to use these systems for more than they’re capable of doing," said Cappelli, director of Wharton’s Center for Human Resources. "They have so constrained their criteria, they end up with nothing. They want skill sets that don’t exist."

Cappelli says the software often is inflexible and can’t determine "all the different ways that somebody might be qualified" for a job. Instead, he said, candidates are asked a series of yes-or-no questions designed to find someone who’s already doing the precise job the employer is trying to fill.

"It explains why employers feel that there’s nobody for them to hire, even though any objective observer would say there are hundreds of people who could do your job."


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For Skibinski, a 36-year-old Army veteran who switched careers in 2006 after being laid off as a field engineer and project manager in the lottery industry, the computerized job-application process is full of stumbling blocks and frustration. He said his status as a veteran hasn’t helped him.

In the past couple of years, Skibinski has applied for graduate assistantships, entry-level planning positions, jobs at Walmart, Target and Starbucks — anything to bring in a paycheck.

The result? Either no response or a rejection note, even when he met all the minimum requirements.

After he applied recently for a planning position at a government agency, an emailed reply said, "You did not meet one or more of the experience requirements and are therefore considered ineligible at this time." He tracked down an HR representative and talked to her about his background, and she agreed he met the requirements, Skibinski said.

"That’s when she said they can’t interview everyone," he said. "She could not tell me specifically why."

Melanie Woodfolk, a 34-year-old Parkville, Md., resident who was laid off in April when her position as a marketing manager at a Baltimore publishing company was eliminated, said she’d always been able to find jobs quickly.

Now, after months of online job hunting, she’s still looking.

"I feel like my resume just goes into an abyss," she said. "I’ve submitted [it] to jobs that match me perfectly and hear zilch.

"What’s most frustrating is knowing there isn’t anybody to follow up with. These systems are looking for certain keywords, and if I don’t have that one keyword they’re looking for, I’m excluded even if I’m highly qualified. They’re looking for a reason not to hire you, more so than a reason to hire."

But for companies trying to sort through an avalanche of applications at a time of record unemployment, tracking systems can be a "godsend," said Dawn Haag-Hatterer, a human resources advisory consultant based in Frederick, Md. She said the systems help companies weed out "the folks who truly don’t belong in the applicant pool."

Companies began shifting from paper to electronic applications in the 1990s to make it easier for people to apply and to save on recruitment costs, Cappelli said. Because it’s so easy to apply online, companies have been inundated with thousands of applicants for every opening, he said.

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