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(LM Otero | The Associated Press) Since last summer, American, Delta Air Lines, Frontier Airlines and United Airlines have increased the percentage of coach seats requiring an extra fee.
Two seats together on a plane? Be ready to pay fee
Air travel » More windows, aisles going to passengers willing to shell out extra.
First Published May 21 2012 05:28 pm • Last Updated May 22 2012 11:02 am

New York • If you’re flying this summer, be prepared to kiss your family goodbye at the gate. Even if they’re on the same plane.

Airlines are reserving a growing number of window and aisle seats for passengers willing to pay extra. That’s helping to boost revenue but also making it harder for friends and family members who don’t pay this fee to sit next to each other. At the peak of the summer travel season, it might be nearly impossible.

At a glance

What families can do

New seat assignments can be snagged for free starting five days before departure as some elite fliers are upgraded to first class.

Another block of seats is released 24 hours in advance when online check-in starts.

Gate agents can sometimes put families in seats set aside for disabled passengers or ask others to move.

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Buying tickets two or more months in advance makes things a little easier. But passengers are increasingly finding that the only way to sit next to a spouse, child or friend is to shell out $25 or more, each way.

With base fares on the rise — the average roundtrip ticket this summer is forecast by Kayak.com to be $431, or 3 percent higher than last year — some families are reluctant to cough up more money.

"Who wants to fly like this?" said Khampha Bouaphanh, a photographer from Fort Worth, Texas. "It gets more ridiculous every year."

Bouaphanh balked at paying an extra $114 roundtrip in fees to reserve three adjacent seats for him, his wife and their 4-year-old daughter on an upcoming trip to Disney World. "I’m hoping that when we can get to the counter, they can accommodate us for free."

Airlines say their gate agents try to help family members without adjacent seats sit together, especially people flying with small children. Yet there is no guarantee things will work out.

Not everyone is complaining.

Frequent business travelers used to get stuck with middle seats, even though their last-minute fares were two or three times higher than the average. Now, airlines are setting aside more window and aisle seats for their most frequent fliers at no extra cost.

"The customers who are more loyal, who fly more often, we want to make sure they have the best travel experience," said Eduardo Marcos, American Airline’s manager of merchandising strategy.


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For everybody else, choosing seats on airline websites has become more of a guessing game.

To travelers who haven’t earned "elite" status in a frequent-flier program, flights often appear full, even though they are not. These casual travelers end up paying extra for an aisle or window seat believing they have no other option.

But as flight departures, get closer many of the seats airlines had set aside for those willing to pay a premium do become available — at no extra cost.

"Airlines are holding these seats hostage," said George Hobica, founder of travel site AirfareWatchdog. "The seat selection process isn’t as fair as it used to be."

Airlines are searching for more ways to raise revenue to offset rising fuel costs. In the past five years, they have added fees for checked baggage, watching TV, skipping security lines and boarding early.

Now they are turning to seats.

Since last summer, American, Delta Air Lines, Frontier Airlines and United Airlines have increased the percentage of coach seats requiring an extra fee. Some — such as those on Delta, JetBlue Airways and United — come with more legroom. Others, including those on American and US Airways, are just as cramped but are window and aisle seats near the front.

Allegiant Air and Spirit Airlines go one step further, charging extra for any advanced seat assignment. On Spirit, passengers who aren’t willing to pay the extra $5 to $15 per flight, are assigned a seat at check-in. The computer doesn’t make any effort to keep families together.

"It gets really difficult, unfortunately, because all you end up with is a lot of onesies and twosies," said Barry Biffle, Spirit’s chief marketing officer. "If you want to sit together, we would highly encourage you to get seat assignments in advance."

Delta just launched a discounted "Basic Economy" fare on certain routes where it competes with Spirit that doesn’t include advance seat assignments.

"Airlines have to be careful. They can only push this so far before they risk incurring the wrath of customers or the government," said Henry Harteveldt, co-founder Atmosphere Research Group.

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