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Burger King’s new menu — a lot like McDonald’s

Fast food » Ailing chain says research driving its big changes.



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Burger King quietly put some changes in place over the past year. The French fries are thicker so they’ll stay hot longer. Burgers now come with one slice of cheese instead of two, so it melts more evenly. And naturally-smoked bacon is now cooked at each restaurant. Previously, Burger King had used a pre-cooked variety with a smoked flavor sprayed on.

Once executives settled on menu items, it was time to go to the masses. Would the new items measure up to those of Burger King’s competitors? To find out, the company conducted consumer tests and revised its recipes over months.

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Burger King considered making Panini-pressed snack wraps, for example, but tests showed customers wanted something lighter. The wraps it settled on closely resemble the ones offered at McDonald’s — a chicken strip sprinkled with cheese, lettuce and dressing wrapped in a flour tortilla. McDonald’s even offers the same flavors — honey mustard and ranch.

Even seemingly straightforward items had to be reworked over and over. The new "Homestyle Chicken Strips" went through 11 variations before the final version was selected. And it took about seven months and six tries before the company found the right mix of creaminess, iciness and tanginess for its strawberry banana and tropical mango smoothies.

"They didn’t rush these products out to market," said McDonald, the Burger King franchisee who regularly eats at competitors to stay on top of what they’re doing. He said he’s confident the new menu items stack up to rivals. "They got feedback from consumers and reformulated them to get it right."

Eldy Pick, a customer who was at a renovated Burger King near the company’s headquarters in Miami, said she liked having some lighter options. She normally gets the chicken or fish sandwiches and said the new cranberry apple salad she was eating was "a treat."

But food isn’t Burger King’s only problem. Many of its restaurants are showing signs of aging. So the company decided it wanted to give them a more modern look that mixes leather armchairs, high stools and plastic chairs in warmer lighting. High partitions will create more privacy in some seating areas. The makeover costs an average of more than $275,000 per restaurant.

That presents another challenge: getting buy-in from franchisees, who own 90 percent of the chain’s U.S. stores. So the company is offering those who sign up for the remodeling incentives, such as a 50 percent discount on the annual $50,000 franchise fee.

So far, more than 1,000 franchise locations are slated to be updated in the next year. Over the next three years, 2,500 will be remodeled.

Customers will see changes even in stores that aren’t remodeled. The drab red, black or blue shirts workers used to wear have been replaced by metal gray shirts and aprons that were designed with the help of employees. Wrappers, cups and bags now have vivid photos of food that were shot by the same photographer responsible for the catalogs of the high-end housewares retailer Williams-Sonoma.


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To get the word out about the changes, Burger King is rolling out its biggest marketing campaign ever. TV ads will feature celebrities, including soccer player David Beckham, comedian Jay Leno and actress Salma Hayek. In one spot, R&B singer Mary J. Blige croons the ingredients of the snack wraps.

Whether the star power of the ads, updated stores and the new food on the menu can fix Burger King’s troubles remains to be seen. But Alex Macedo, chief marketing officer for Burger King North America, said the chain has a good chance of rebounding because Burger King is a brand everyone knows.

"People love Burger King and really want a reason to come back," he said.



Copyright 2014 The Salt Lake Tribune. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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