Quantcast
Get breaking news alerts via email

Click here to manage your alerts
In this film image released by Lionsgate, Matthew Morrison, left, and Cameron Diaz are shown in a scene from "What to Expect When You're Expecting." (AP Photo/Lionsgate, Melissa Moseley)
Movie review: ‘What to Expect’? An up-and-down comedy
First Published May 17 2012 03:18 pm • Last Updated May 18 2012 11:05 am

Too bad you can’t watch "What to Expect When You’re Expecting" the way most people read the best-selling self-help book: by skipping the unnecessary bits and diving into the important stuff.

This comedy takes the "New Year’s Eve" approach to pregnancy, intercutting stories of five women dealing with impending motherhood: TV fitness trainer Jules (Cameron Diaz), expecting after an affair with her celebrity dance-show partner Evan ("Glee’s" Matthew Morrison); baby-store owner Wendy (Elizabeth Banks), finally pregnant after years of trying with nebbish husband Gary ("Bridesmaids’" Ben Falcone); Skylar (Brooklyn Decker), trophy wife of Gary’s overcompetitive father, Ramsey (Dennis Quaid); Rosie (Anna Kendrick), a young chef knocked up after a one-night stand with a rival food-truck operator, Marco (Chace Crawford); and Holly (Jennifer Lopez), a photographer seeking with her husband, Alex (Rodrigo Santoro), to adopt an orphan from Ethiopia.

At a glance

HHhj

‘What to Expect When You’re Expecting’

Opens Friday, May 18, at theaters everywhere; rated PG-13 for crude and sexual content, thematic elements and language; 110 minutes. For more movie reviews, visit nowsaltlake.com/movies.

Join the Discussion
Post a Comment

Screenwriters Shauna Cross ("Whip It") and Heather Hach ("Freaky Friday") load up the predictable jokes about stretch marks, bladder pressure and tender nipples — and draw some good humor by creating "the Dudes Group," a confab of stroller-pushing papas led by the always-funny Chris Rock.

Director Kirk Jones ("Nanny McPhee," "Waking Ned Devine") balances the humor with the serious bits well, but has a harder time balancing the over-the-top performances (by Diaz and Quaid, especially) with the more subtle storylines (notably in Kendrick’s fine performance).

movies@sltrib.com; nowsaltlake.com/movies




Copyright 2014 The Salt Lake Tribune. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Top Reader Comments Read All Comments Post a Comment
Click here to read all comments   Click here to post a comment


About Reader Comments


Reader comments on sltrib.com are the opinions of the writer, not The Salt Lake Tribune. We will delete comments containing obscenities, personal attacks and inappropriate or offensive remarks. Flagrant or repeat violators will be banned. If you see an objectionable comment, please alert us by clicking the arrow on the upper right side of the comment and selecting "Flag comment as inappropriate". If you've recently registered with Disqus or aren't seeing your comments immediately, you may need to verify your email address. To do so, visit disqus.com/account.
See more about comments here.
Staying Connected
Videos
Jobs
Contests and Promotions
  • Search Obituaries
  • Place an Obituary

  • Search Cars
  • Search Homes
  • Search Jobs
  • Search Marketplace
  • Search Legal Notices

  • Other Services
  • Advertise With Us
  • Subscribe to the Newspaper
  • Login to the Electronic Edition
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Contact a newsroom staff member
  • Access the Trib Archives
  • Privacy Policy
  • Missing your paper? Need to place your paper on vacation hold? For this and any other subscription related needs, click here or call 801.204.6100.