Quantcast
Get breaking news alerts via email

Click here to manage your alerts
In this March 25, 2014 photo, Boston Marathon bombing survivor Marc Fucarile, right, wipes his eye while sitting in a wheelchair across from his fiancee, Jen Regan, left, at their home in Reading, Mass. "Everything has changed," he says. "How I use the bathroom, how I shower, how I brush my teeth, how I get in and out of bed." (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
A year after bombing, Boston and its people heal
First Published Apr 12 2014 01:31 pm • Last Updated Apr 12 2014 01:31 pm

Boston• Every time Roseann Sdoia comes home, she must climb 18 steps — six stairs into the building, 12 more to her apartment. It is an old building in Boston’s North End, with doors that are big and heavy, not an easy place for an amputee to live.

When she left the hospital, a month after the Boston marathon bombing, she had a choice: She could find another place to live, one more suitable for someone who wears a prosthetic that replaces most of her right leg. Or, she could stay.

Join the Discussion
Post a Comment

"Early on when all this happened, so many people were telling me to move out of the city and move out of my apartment because of the stairs and I don’t have an elevator and parking is not very convenient," she recalls. "But I have been able to get past all of that."

In that, she mirrors Boston itself.

"I have to tell you, honestly, Boston is a better city now than it was before," says Thomas Menino, Boston’s former mayor. "People learned how to deal with each other, they had to deal with a tragedy."

Not that it’s been easy. Three people were killed at last year’s Boston Marathon, and more than 260 were injured, and the legacy of trauma and lost limbs remains — as does the shock of having endured a terrorist attack on Marathon Monday. Nor can Bostonians forget the fear that gripped a city locked down in the midst of a manhunt.

But Boston has been able to get past all of that. Copley Square is no longer littered with impromptu tributes to the dead and injured; they’re now on display in an exhibit at the Boston Public Library, where Robert White of Lynn saw meaning in every teddy bear and pair of sneakers: "Every last one of the items says ‘Boston Strong’ or ‘I will return next year.’"

———

Roseann Sdoia is 46 years old, a vice president of property management for a Boston development company. She is a cheerful woman; she smiles broadly when she arrives at the Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital in Charlestown for physical therapy.

"It’s just my nature," she says. "I’m not a negative person. I’m not a Debbie Downer."


story continues below
story continues below

Still, she says, she cries every day.

"What is sinking in is that life has changed," she says, her face awash with tears.

Sdoia is a runner, but she did not take part in the marathon. She was at the finish line on April 15, rooting for friends in the race, when the second bomb went off. Aside from her leg injury, she suffered hearing loss.

"Other than losing the bottom of my right leg, I’m still me," she says. "I haven’t changed, I am still the same person I was before."

And yet, so much has changed. She had to take more leave from the job she loved. Winter, and snow, were tough to handle. She’s had to tackle daily tasks — showering, vacuuming — differently.

Marc Fucarile, a 35-year-old roofer from Stoneham, also lost his right leg from above the knee; he has shrapnel in his heart, and still could lose his left leg.

"Everything has changed," he says. "How I use the bathroom, how I shower, how I brush my teeth, how I get in and out of bed."

His 6-year-old son, Gavin, does not always understand. "Gavin is like, ‘Hey, you want to go out and play?’ and I’m like, ‘There’s a foot of snow. I can’t do snow. We’re not going out and playing right now, sorry buddy.’ It breaks my heart."

———

In the first three months after the explosions, the One Fund collected nearly $61 million in donations. In the next five months, another $12 million in contributions came in.

This big-heartedness was mirrored by a sort of proud defiance, exemplified by "Boston Strong." The amount of merchandise bearing the slogan was astonishing.

Next Page >


Copyright 2014 The Salt Lake Tribune. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Top Reader Comments Read All Comments Post a Comment
Click here to read all comments   Click here to post a comment


About Reader Comments


Reader comments on sltrib.com are the opinions of the writer, not The Salt Lake Tribune. We will delete comments containing obscenities, personal attacks and inappropriate or offensive remarks. Flagrant or repeat violators will be banned. If you see an objectionable comment, please alert us by clicking the arrow on the upper right side of the comment and selecting "Flag comment as inappropriate". If you've recently registered with Disqus or aren't seeing your comments immediately, you may need to verify your email address. To do so, visit disqus.com/account.
See more about comments here.
Staying Connected
Videos
Jobs
Contests and Promotions
  • Search Obituaries
  • Place an Obituary

  • Search Cars
  • Search Homes
  • Search Jobs
  • Search Marketplace
  • Search Legal Notices

  • Other Services
  • Advertise With Us
  • Subscribe to the Newspaper
  • Access your e-Edition
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Contact a newsroom staff member
  • Access the Trib Archives
  • Privacy Policy
  • Missing your paper? Need to place your paper on vacation hold? For this and any other subscription related needs, click here or call 801.204.6100.